Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut July 08, 2014 - 1:35 pm

What’s on for Nunavut Day?

July 9 marks date in 1993 when Nunavut Land Claims Agreement, Nunavut Act came into force

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Nunavummiut are invited to barbecues and country food feasts in many communities across the territory, like at this 2011 Nunavut Day event in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)
Nunavummiut are invited to barbecues and country food feasts in many communities across the territory, like at this 2011 Nunavut Day event in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)
Kasuktaqtiit, a group of Iqaluit gumboot performers, will entertain Iqalummiut at Nunavut Day celebrations July 9. (PHOTO COURTESY OF TIBO PHOTOGRAPHY)
Kasuktaqtiit, a group of Iqaluit gumboot performers, will entertain Iqalummiut at Nunavut Day celebrations July 9. (PHOTO COURTESY OF TIBO PHOTOGRAPHY)

Nunavummiut will celebrate the land they call home July 9 at Nunavut Day events taking place across the territory.

Nunavut Day, celebrated annually on July 9, marks the day in 1993 that the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act and the Nunavut Act came into legal force 21 years ago.

That agreement paved the way for implementation of the land claims agreement and the creation of the new territory on April 1, 1999, making this Nunavut’s 15th year.

As in past years, the day means fun and events for the entire family in communities across Nunavut.

In the territory’s capital, events kick off at noon in front of the Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. monument, where territorial leaders will welcome participants and announce the winners of Iqaluit’s cake-decorating contest.

The Igluvut building will host a feast and barbecue starting at 12:30, with games, entertainment by Iqaluit performers Kasuktaqtiit, and music by local groups the Trade-Offs, the Jerry Cans and accordion player Simeonie Keenainak and his band.

From 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., the Nunavut Arts and Crafts Association will be hosting its annual craft fair at the cadet hall.

To facilitate those activities, the city of Iqaluit will close the Queen Elizabeth Way from the Igluvut building parking lot to the four corners, and from there to the Hotel Arctic, between 8:30 am to 4:00 pm on July 9.

And starting at 7:00 p.m., Iqalummiut can head over to the Astro Theatre to check out NTI’s Inuktitut film festival, featuring films like Nanook Taxi, Super Shamou and Maina.

Iqaluit will also host premiers from six other provinces and territories July 9 and 10 as part of this year’s Western Premiers’ Conference.

For the first time in his new role, Nunavut Premier Peter Taptuna will host premiers from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, as well as the Northwest Territories and Yukon in Iqaluit to discuss how to strengthen ties between western Canada’s northern and remote communities.

Nunavummiut outside of Iqaluit should check with their local hamlet or regional Inuit organization office to find out what’s on July 9.

In Cambridge Bay, a number of local organizations have teamed up to host a barbecue starting at 1:00 pm at the Killinik baseball field.

Through the afternoon, there will be a number of games for children and adults, including harpoon throw, a four-man tug-of-war and a bannock-making contest.

In Rankin Inlet, residents can take part in a basketball tournament at Victor’s playground starting at 12:30; a craft sale also kicks off outside the local NTI officers at 1:00 pm.

And in Pangnirtung, the hamlet has hidden Nunavut pins around the community. Residents can join a search for the pins, each worth $50, starting at 10:00 am.

At 11:00 am, fishermen and women can head down to the shoreline win cash prizes for catching the longest fish.

Starting at 1:00 pm, the hamlet is hosting a full afternoon of games at the baseball diamond, followed by a community barbecue at 6:00 pm.

Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share Comment on this story...

(7) Comments:

#1. Posted by DISSED on July 08, 2014

We were better off with NWT. Nunavut is pronounced None Of IT

#2. Posted by snapshot on July 08, 2014

@ #1, There’s one solution to your problem, MOVE TO NWT then!!!

#3. Posted by Where was our Champion? on July 09, 2014

So where was our Champion Leona today? Did not see her in Iqaluit. At least our B-C senator came for a visit…

#4. Posted by Underpaid on July 10, 2014

Celebrating Nunavut Day on April 1st was a more realistic celebration as Nunavut was created on that date. It also signifies what fools we were in splitting from the Northwest Territories.

#5. Posted by wardback nunavut on July 10, 2014

i agree with #1, to think that 16 year olds even knew what their future would hold when they voted at the referendum back in 1993, and elders that were convinced they would receive 100 measley bux a month you think they would vote for it today?
i think the ones that are handed out the good stuff are related to those that are at the top of the food chain like the governments, NTI & the other one, just look at the shape Iqaluit is in, and the smaller communities, housing has no more, we have more homeless people, to think I never ever saw this many homeless people in my hometown before NONEOFIT was here. #2 must be related in some way to top of the chain.

#6. Posted by Questionable Intentions on July 10, 2014

To call our territory a possessive ‘Nunavut-Our Lands’ sounds so territorial and Inuit were not territorial or possive. I’m speechless.

#7. Posted by Small towner on July 10, 2014

I see on the ads (right side) of this page, an ad saying “On July 9, Nunavut turns 15”. Shouldn’t Nunavut have turned 15 on April 1st of this year? Or July 9, 2008?

IMO Nunavut Day should be celebrated on April 1st…

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

Please enter the word you see in the image below:


 THIS WEEK’S ADS

 ADVERTISING


        


Custom Search