Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Around the Arctic September 12, 2017 - 4:00 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Sept. 3 to Sept. 10

Story of man who died in burning boat he lived in tops the week's most-read stories

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows a long line of Iqaluit residents waiting to buy beer and wine at the new store, which opened Sept. 6. On Friday, Sept. 8, many, hoping to beat the post-work rush, were met with a daunting lineup even in the early afternoon. Incomplete renovations at the store also made parking difficult, with many cars simply pulling over along the curb. The beer and wine store is open Tuesday to Saturday, from noon until 7 p.m. All patrons must first create a customer account before ordering, which can now be done inside the store. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows a long line of Iqaluit residents waiting to buy beer and wine at the new store, which opened Sept. 6. On Friday, Sept. 8, many, hoping to beat the post-work rush, were met with a daunting lineup even in the early afternoon. Incomplete renovations at the store also made parking difficult, with many cars simply pulling over along the curb. The beer and wine store is open Tuesday to Saturday, from noon until 7 p.m. All patrons must first create a customer account before ordering, which can now be done inside the store. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)

In a week marked by many events, including a major successful search and rescue operation in Frobisher Bay, a story about Jacopie Akpalialuk, 70, whose badly burned body was found Aug. 31 in a 20-foot covered canoe that had caught fire, drew the most readers to Nunatsiaqonline.ca.

Akpalialuk, who often used the boat as a living space, was going to fly home to Pangnirtung the previous week, after living in Iqaluit for about 13 years.

“It was a terrible ordeal,” said his sister Mary Akpalialuk, saying the boat had already been engulfed in flames when she arrived at the site, and that a bystander was calling out Jacopie’s name to see if he was nearby.

You can read the whole story here.

Also, many Nunatsiaq News readers wanted to learn more about how Nunavik driver plowed into pedestrians over the Labour Day weekend.

The incident took place in the Hudson coast community of Umiujaq, where the Kativik Regional Police Force said a 29-year-old man stole a vehicle Sept. 2 at about 8 p.m.

Video footage provided by a witness to Nunatsiaq News shows a driver speeding recklessly through the streets of the community of about 400 people.

You can read—and see—more here.

Also among the top five online reads, according to Google Analytics, which tracks online traffic on Nunatsiaqonline.ca:

• a letter to the editor talks about how an Iqaluit resident walked out of the Qikiqtani General Hospital in Iqaluit: “Yesterday I walked out, against medical advice. I did so because I deemed the stress resulting from being treated like a piece of work-in-process by the medical staff posed a greater risk than the chance of short-term complications;

a major search and rescue operation in Frobisher Bay near Iqaluit located two boaters, CBC employee Michael Salomonie and his teenaged son Ian, who were picked up at about 3:30 a.m. Sept. 5 by an RCAF Cormorant helicopter, ending a wide-scale search that started Sept. 3 in Frobisher Bay. The two overdue boaters, travelling in a freighter canoe, had gone out fishing Sept. 3, but failed to return on time; and,

an Iqaluit man calls for Nunavut-wide boycott of Fiat-Chrysler products: Iqaluit resident John Fawcett is stuck with a 2014 Jeep Cherokee that was recalled by its manufacturer, Fiat-Chrysler, because of a defective transmission and other problems, such as a back-hatch wire that could catch fire and bad airbag sensors. To get those problems fixed, the company wants him to spend about $24,000, more than what he paid for it, to ship the vehicle south.

The second most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page was actually a series of photos from the MosaïCanada 150 sculpture garden at Parc Jacques-Cartier in Gatineau. Presented by Mosaïcultures International de Montréal, the garden features sculptures covered in plants—such as the muskox shown here—which require meticulous and frequent trimming and which change colour and texture with the seasons. With 33 sculptures in all, each province is represented along with pieces that commemorate events and famous Canadians. There are also five sculptures devoted to Indigenous legends. The garden is open daily, rain or shine, until Oct. 15. (PHOTO BY LISA GREGOIRE)
The second most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page was actually a series of photos from the MosaïCanada 150 sculpture garden at Parc Jacques-Cartier in Gatineau. Presented by Mosaïcultures International de Montréal, the garden features sculptures covered in plants—such as the muskox shown here—which require meticulous and frequent trimming and which change colour and texture with the seasons. With 33 sculptures in all, each province is represented along with pieces that commemorate events and famous Canadians. There are also five sculptures devoted to Indigenous legends. The garden is open daily, rain or shine, until Oct. 15. (PHOTO BY LISA GREGOIRE)
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