Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut October 18, 2016 - 1:10 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Oct. 9 to Oct. 16

Bryan Pearson, Iqaluit's first mayor, dies at 82

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares: Bryan R. Pearson seen here in a photo taken in 1995 at the old Nunatsiaq News offices, who died Oct. 12 after a painful, 10-month struggle with liver cancer. Pearson was 82. Pearson, who had lived in the eastern Arctic since 1956, came home to Iqaluit to die this past August. “It was a decent homecoming. It was special and overwhelming. After the reception I received, I decided this is a good place for me to live,” Pearson told Nunatsiaq News about two weeks ago. Pearson served as Iqaluit’s first mayor, helped found the first municipal council, served as territorial councillor, and started numerous businesses, including the Arctic Ventures store and the Astro Theatre. (FILE PHOTO)
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares: Bryan R. Pearson seen here in a photo taken in 1995 at the old Nunatsiaq News offices, who died Oct. 12 after a painful, 10-month struggle with liver cancer. Pearson was 82. Pearson, who had lived in the eastern Arctic since 1956, came home to Iqaluit to die this past August. “It was a decent homecoming. It was special and overwhelming. After the reception I received, I decided this is a good place for me to live,” Pearson told Nunatsiaq News about two weeks ago. Pearson served as Iqaluit’s first mayor, helped found the first municipal council, served as territorial councillor, and started numerous businesses, including the Arctic Ventures store and the Astro Theatre. (FILE PHOTO)
The second most-popular photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page— nd a photo which is also the new Facebook profile photo for our Facebook page: Winter returns to the Arctic, as seen Oct. 11 in Pangnirtung. (PHOTO BY DAVID KILABUK)
The second most-popular photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page— nd a photo which is also the new Facebook profile photo for our Facebook page: Winter returns to the Arctic, as seen Oct. 11 in Pangnirtung. (PHOTO BY DAVID KILABUK)

Two stories vied for the top place this past week among the readers of Nunatsiaqonline.ca, according to Google Analytics which tracks online traffic.

Many wanted to read about a man who is “never to be forgotten”—Bryan R. Pearson.

Stricken by liver cancer, Pearson, Iqaluit’s founding mayor, 82, died at home in Iqaluit Oct. 12.

Pearson, also founder of the first municipal council and founder of the 51-year-old Toonik Tyme festival, brought “flamboyant style and entrepreneurial panache to his work at a time when the political life of the eastern Arctic was often stifled by faraway bureaucrats in Ottawa and Yellowknife,” wrote Nunatsiaq News editor Jim Bell in his obituary of Pearson, which you can read here.

Funeral services for Pearson took place Oct. 17 in Iqaluit.

In other news, clowns were on the mind of a Nunavut community—but not in a funny way. Many in Rankin Inlet reported creepy clown sightings over the long Thanksgiving weekend, prompting the hamlet to step up night patrols following complaints.

Creepy clowns have been inspired by cartoon characters such as the Evil Clown, a minor villain in Disney’s The Brave Little Toaster. But the residents of Rankin Inlet, population roughly 3,000, were outraged by the attempts to scare children.

The other stories in the top five:

Nunavut police seized ecstasy, weed and cash in Iqaluit: Man, 32, and a teenager face possession, trafficking charges—on Oct.9 police seized 400 pills of methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy, 1.1 pounds of marijuana and $1,095 in cash;

Nunavut police seized weed and cash in Rankin Inlet: Members of the Rankin Inlet RCMP detachment seized seven ounces of marijuana and $2,145 in cash, and two Rankin Inlet men, not identified by the RCMP, were arrested and charged in connection with the drugs and cash that police found; and,

Inuit need open communication on race and racism: A letter to the editor said “we have to have an authentic understanding of how racism is structured”

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