Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Around the Arctic October 24, 2016 - 4:00 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Oct. 16 to Oct. 23

Top story: Quebec's human rights commission says many Nunavik youth at risk

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares: Bryan Pearson’s last journey. A cross bearing the message “In loving memory/Robin, Valerie and Family” leans against a hearse, awaiting the end of a memorial service held Oct. 17 at the Iqaluit Cadet Hall. Pearson, 82, Iqaluit's first mayor, died this past Oct. 12. (PHOTO BY JIM BELL)
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares: Bryan Pearson’s last journey. A cross bearing the message “In loving memory/Robin, Valerie and Family” leans against a hearse, awaiting the end of a memorial service held Oct. 17 at the Iqaluit Cadet Hall. Pearson, 82, Iqaluit's first mayor, died this past Oct. 12. (PHOTO BY JIM BELL)

In a news-filled week, a La Presse article translated from French into English by Nunatsiaq News was the week’s top story on Nunatsiaqonline.ca.

According to Google Analytics which tracks our online traffic, many wanted to read how the head of Quebec’s human rights commission says problems associated with education, housing and substance abuse in this region are putting Nunavimmiut youth in serious danger.

The president of the Quebec Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission, Camil Picard, recently wrote to several Couillard government ministers, saying the safety and development of children in Nunavik are threatened.

Picard had returned from a trip to Nunavik, from which he drew an undeniable conclusion: The problems associated with education, housing and drinking in this region are putting youth in serious danger. And the solutions cannot “come from the Grande Allée,” [home to Quebec’s National Assembly] but from the communities involved.

You can read the full story here.

A warning to members of the public in Iqaluit to be careful walking around the city at night was the past week’s second most-read story.

On Oct.16 at about 2 a.m., members of the Iqaluit RCMP were called in to investigate a report of a robbery at knife-point.

Their investigation revealed that two women were walking in the early morning hours near the Four Corners intersection of Iqaluit, behind a local business, when a lone man, wearing dark clothing with a hood, approached them.

The man produced a knife, stole a woman’s purse and fled the scene.

The week’s other top stories included:

Another big drug seizure in Iqaluit: On Oct. 12 investigators from the RCMP V Division Federal Operations Section in Iqaluit executed a search warrant and seized cash and drugs from a residence in the city. The search resulted in the seizure of $700 in cash, about a kilogram (more than two pounds) of marijuana, roughly a half a kilogram (one pound) of hashish, and a small amount of cocaine;

The North needs more airline competition: The North’s airline monopoly needs competition, said a letter to the editor..“There are very weak regulations in Canada for protection of Canadian customers, especially in the North;”

MLA bashes Nunavut youth protection in the Nunavut Legistlature: Isaac Shooyook, the MLA for Quttiktuq, said Oct. 19 that the child apprehension practices of the Family Services department traumatizes families and that “we are going to see a disintegration of the family under the current system.”

 

 

The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: A newly released pan-Arctic map showing areas vulnerable to change. The map, published last week in Nature Communications, shows where frozen soil could collapse creating lakes, wetlands and small hills, called thermokarst landscapes. Red areas on the map indicate where hilly landscapes could likely form, green areas are where wetlands could likely form, and blue areas show where lakes could likely form. “This map is a first step to answer how the landscape will change with the thawing of permafrost in a warming climate,” Vladimir Romanovsky, co-author of the paper and a geophysicist at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, said on eos.org. “This is the big picture, it is useful as a general idea of what we should expect on a circumpolar scale.” (MAP/OLEFELDT ET AL)
The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: A newly released pan-Arctic map showing areas vulnerable to change. The map, published last week in Nature Communications, shows where frozen soil could collapse creating lakes, wetlands and small hills, called thermokarst landscapes. Red areas on the map indicate where hilly landscapes could likely form, green areas are where wetlands could likely form, and blue areas show where lakes could likely form. “This map is a first step to answer how the landscape will change with the thawing of permafrost in a warming climate,” Vladimir Romanovsky, co-author of the paper and a geophysicist at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, said on eos.org. “This is the big picture, it is useful as a general idea of what we should expect on a circumpolar scale.” (MAP/OLEFELDT ET AL)
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