Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut November 15, 2016 - 8:30 am

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca between Nov. 6 and Nov. 13

Microbeads, foster parent case and Donald Trump lead the news

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares:Aupaluk Canadian Ranger patrol member, Martin Scott, second from left, is the recipient of the Governor General's Order of Military Merit, which recognizes exceptional service by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. Scott is a master corporal and long-time leader of the patrol in Aupaluk, whose members are pictured here in 2013 when Scott won the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal. He's among 46 recipients received the award at a Nov. 10 ceremony at Rideau Hall. (PHOTO BY YVES BERNIER/2CPRG)
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares:Aupaluk Canadian Ranger patrol member, Martin Scott, second from left, is the recipient of the Governor General's Order of Military Merit, which recognizes exceptional service by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. Scott is a master corporal and long-time leader of the patrol in Aupaluk, whose members are pictured here in 2013 when Scott won the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal. He's among 46 recipients received the award at a Nov. 10 ceremony at Rideau Hall. (PHOTO BY YVES BERNIER/2CPRG)

The top story of the week from Nov. 6 to Nov. 13 on Nunatsiaqonline.ca: How Canada plans to plan the sale of toiletries like body washes, toothpastes and facial scrubs which contain tiny plastic balls called microbeads.

That ban comes into effect July 1, 2018.

Then, a year later, the ban will apply to natural health products and non-prescription drugs.

The ban will have a direct impact on the Arctic: These plastic microbeads, first patented for use in cleansers in 1972, now end up in Arctic sea ice, where they act like magnets and attract other contaminants.

You can read the whole story here.

And the second most-read story of the past week, according to Google Analytics which tracks our online traffic, concerned a recent court judgment in Iqaluit, in which a judge determined that reasonable doubt made a Nunavut foster parent not guilty of molesting children.

Family Services had listed the self-described alcoholic as a “suitable” foster parent

On Nov. 4 Justice Bonnie Tulloch said the self-described alcoholic who fostered children, “probably” molested an underage girl placed in his foster care and another underage girl in his home in 2013, but he was not guilty.

That was followed up in the Nunavut Legislature Nov. 8 when Iqaluit-Sinaa MLA Paul Okalik questioned Family Services Minister Johnny Mike about how a man who admitted to being an alcoholic could be deemed a suitable foster parent.

During question period, Okalik referred to a recent Nunatsiaq News story about that foster parent.

Also in the news, the impact of Donald Trump’s election on the Arctic which could mean more heat, development and militarization.

Changes also lie ahead for the United States-led Arctic Council.

And those are among several possible developments—such as increased Arctic oil drilling and a beefed-up Arctic defence system—which could occur after Trump takes office as president of the United States in January.

Also among the top five stories: A Nunavut man alleges senior bureaucrats tossed out rules to get rid of him, with court documents alleging the man’s GN bosses repeatedly targetted him for reprimands and dismissal.

The second most-popular story of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: The sun rises as Noel Jr. Kaludjak skins the polar bear he shot early Nov. 7 outside Coral Harbour. Kaludjak had some help skinning the animal, from fellow hunter Darryl Nakoolak, right, while 12-year-old Sammy Bruce, left watches and learns. The Kivalliq community was allocated 10 tags for polar bear harvests this year. (PHOTO BY NOEL KALUDJAK
The second most-popular story of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: The sun rises as Noel Jr. Kaludjak skins the polar bear he shot early Nov. 7 outside Coral Harbour. Kaludjak had some help skinning the animal, from fellow hunter Darryl Nakoolak, right, while 12-year-old Sammy Bruce, left watches and learns. The Kivalliq community was allocated 10 tags for polar bear harvests this year. (PHOTO BY NOEL KALUDJAK
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