Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut May 15, 2017 - 4:00 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from May 7 to May 14

Nunavut community's success in suicide prevention leads the most-read list

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular story of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares shows this polar bear skin, meticulously stretched and propped against a Happy Valley home in Iqaluit May 6 for drying. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)
The most popular story of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares shows this polar bear skin, meticulously stretched and propped against a Happy Valley home in Iqaluit May 6 for drying. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)

What can prevent suicide in Nunavut? That was the focus of two of the five most-read stories on Nunatsiaqonline.ca this past week.

The top story of the week was an in-depth look at the Nunavut community that appears to have the lowest incidence of suicide: Whale Cove, home to fewer than 500 people on the western coast of Hudson Bay.

George Kuksuk, the minister of Culture and Heritage and MLA for Arviat North-Whale Cove, is from Arviat, but has spent a lot of time in Whale Cove.

He said most of the people who live in Whale Cove are related to the ofamilies relocated there by the Canadian government in 1957-58 when the Kivalliq caribou herds disappeared and people in outpost camps were starving to death.

They know each other well and they have a sense of interdependence, he said.

“They have their own problems like any other community and I’ve been to a lot of communities, but Whale Cove is strong. They are like a big family with very limited resources,” Kuksuk said. “People pull together and work together.”

You can read the whole story here.

In another story, a woman talked to Nunatsiaq News about her frustrating attempts to get help for her distressed son—prompting her to move from Nunavut to Winnipeg.

“I left Nunavut because it couldn’t provide my son with what he needed in order to live,” she said.

More on her story here.

Also among the top five stories according to Google Analytics which tracks online traffic:

Big weed seizure in Nunavik: the Kativik Regional Police Force, working in collaboration with the RCMP and Sûreté du Québec provincial police, seized three kilograms of marijuana at the Kuujjuaq airport May 4. Later the same day, KRPF officers also discovered another two kilograms of marijuana at another location in Kuujjuaq.

Name the beer: Iqaluit’s Nunavut Brewing Co. Ltd. has just launched a competition to name its future beer. You have until the end of the month to enter the contest as often as you want and your suggested beer name should reflect the geographic location of the brewery and have an Arctic theme.

Tusk video: Footage captured by aerial drones as part of a narwhal research camp in Tremblay Sound in north Baffin has given biologists new insights into the behaviour of narwhal. In the footage, a narwhal can be seen using quick taps of its tusk to stun Arctic cod, so the fish are easier to devour.

The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows a magnificent sunset photo taken by Alice Kokiapik of Kuujjuaraapik looking out over Hudson Bay at about 9 p.m. May 9 as a hunter headed home. (PHOTO BY A. KOKIAPIK)
The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows a magnificent sunset photo taken by Alice Kokiapik of Kuujjuaraapik looking out over Hudson Bay at about 9 p.m. May 9 as a hunter headed home. (PHOTO BY A. KOKIAPIK)
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