Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut May 30, 2016 - 2:20 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, May 22 to May 29

Grolar? Pizzly? Questions about unusual bear draw the readers

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The top photo of the week on our Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares: Inukjuak youth Lucy Nappatuk, Sarah Naqtai, Bobby Idlout and Peter Nutaraluk pose May 12 at the Montreal showing of the film they helped produce and star in, called Una Unnikkaavut (This Is Our Story.) Una Unnikkaavut premiered at the Gala Clip 2016, a festival of student films produced through Fusion Jeunesse, a Quebec organization that runs programming in Nunavik schools. The film explores the impact of suicide in the Nunavik community. “We hope this move can be used to prevent suicide in Inuit and First Nations communities, the film’s producers said. “We made it with our hearts, our memories and our hopes.” (PHOTO COURTESY OF YOUTH FUSION)
The top photo of the week on our Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares: Inukjuak youth Lucy Nappatuk, Sarah Naqtai, Bobby Idlout and Peter Nutaraluk pose May 12 at the Montreal showing of the film they helped produce and star in, called Una Unnikkaavut (This Is Our Story.) Una Unnikkaavut premiered at the Gala Clip 2016, a festival of student films produced through Fusion Jeunesse, a Quebec organization that runs programming in Nunavik schools. The film explores the impact of suicide in the Nunavik community. “We hope this move can be used to prevent suicide in Inuit and First Nations communities, the film’s producers said. “We made it with our hearts, our memories and our hopes.” (PHOTO COURTESY OF YOUTH FUSION)
The second-most popular photo on our Facebook page: a look at an Iqaluit food truck. Grey skies and a light snow fall didn't stop some Iqaluit residents May 21 from taking advantage of the food trucks' first day of
The second-most popular photo on our Facebook page: a look at an Iqaluit food truck. Grey skies and a light snow fall didn't stop some Iqaluit residents May 21 from taking advantage of the food trucks' first day of "summer" service for their 2016 season. On the menu: chicken breast poutine, garlic cheese perogi and other foods popular in Nunavut's capital. (PHOTO BY THOMAS ROHNER)

Here’s the story that caught the interest of thousands of Nunatsiaqonline.ca readers this week: a Nunavut biologist has sent a possible “grolar” bear in for DNA analysis.

This move came after an unusual bear was killed in Arviat.

Nunavut residents and people from around the world then invented new tongue-twisters since an Arviat man posted pictures on Facebook of his most recent hunt.

“Female grizzly/polar bear. Got my first bear woohoo!!” Didji Ishalook posted on social media May 15.

But while the bear looks like a hybrid produced by the mating of grizzly bear and a polar bear, Nunavut’s carnivore biologist said May 19 that it’s up to DNA tests to confirm or refute that theory.

You can read all the details here.

The second most-read online story, according to Google Analytics, which tracks traffic on Nunatsiaqonline: a Nunavut administrator has been charged with fraud and theft.

Early May 27, Dennis Zettler called the local RCMP to report a theft from his home.

During the investigation, local RCMP said they found a “large sum of money” within the same home.

That led to the arrest of Zettler, 64, who has worked as the Senior Administrative Officer at the local hamlet office over the past 22 years.

Zettler has been charged with one count of criminal breach of trust, one count of theft over $5,000 and possession of property obtained by crime.

You can read more here.

Here’s a look at the other top-five stories of last week:

Two brothers, under treatment in Winnipeg for multiple stab wounds, after May 12 stabbing in Coral Harbour, are out of hospital: “The children were released from hospital and are in stable condition,” RCMP media spokesperson Const. Lurene Dillon told Nunatsiaq News. The incident remains under investigation, Dillon said. That investigation process has been held by the condition of the mother who remains in hospital, Dillon said May 26, adding that the it’s an “extremely sad situation.”

The western Nunavut town of Cambridge Bay was under brief lockdown May 25 after a false gun scare, coupled with a distressed high school student, produced a lockdown: The two situations led to the lock-down of the high school and then of other offices in this community of 1,800.

The Arctic may be headed for temperature highs not seen in 52 million years: If the world doesn’t find a way to reduce its climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions, the Arctic will face a warmer and wetter future, with temperature rises of between 14.7 C and 19.5 C by 2300. That’s a prediction from research published May 23 in the journal Nature Climate Change which says “the unregulated exploitation of the fossil fuel resource could ultimately result in considerably more profound climate changes than previously suggested.”

And, in case you missed it, the Nunatsiaq News also ran a special three-part series on Inuit children in foster care: Part I of the three-part series looked at the Ottawa-based Inuit community organization, Tungasuvvingat Inuit, which knows of more than 250 Inuit children who have had some contact with the Ottawa Children’s Aid Society in the past five years. Inuit youth represent fewer than 0.1 per cent of all youth in Ottawa but yet they comprise roughly six per cent of all children in care.

You can read Part II in the series — Forging a new path for Inuit kids in care — here, and Part III in the series — Half of Canada’s Inuit foster kids live in non-Inuit homes — here.

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