Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut March 21, 2017 - 7:00 am

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from March 12 to March 19

Nunavut Senator Dennis Patterson set to stay on

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, shows Salluit teacher Maggie MacDonnell who won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize. Through MacDonnell's Life Skills program in Salluit, she did
The most popular photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, shows Salluit teacher Maggie MacDonnell who won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize. Through MacDonnell's Life Skills program in Salluit, she did "something quite extraordinary, something very special," said a March 19 news release on the award. "The key? Turning students from problems in solutions…Maggie McDonnell has made an outstanding contribution to the lives of her students and everyone in Salluit. She is a deserving winner of the $1 million Global Teacher Prize for 2017–money she’ll use to set up an NGO [non-governmental organization]." MacDonnell, second from left, and three of her former students, Larry Thomassie, Samantha Leclerc and Lucasie Amamatuak, attended the Global Education & Skills Forum in Dubai this past week. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE KATIVIK SCHOOL BOARD)
The second-most popular photo on Facebook shows sealskin kamiks and mittens made by Kuujjuaq woman who has used her impressive traditional sewing skills to raise money for the Isuarsivik Treatment Centre. Samantha Ida David crafted kamiks and mitts which will be raffled off at the end of this month to support Isuarsivik's project to build a larger, modern facility. To help its fundraising efforts, she's now raffling the boots and mitts for $5 a ticket or five tickets for $20, with two draws to win. The draw will be called March 31 at 4 p.m. If you don't live in Kuujuaq, you can contact David on Facebook. EMTs are also accepted for the raffle tickets although you'll have to pay for the shipping if you win. David received donations from Tullik and Tivi Galleries in Kuujjuaq for the kamiks, which are a size 7 1/2 in tanned sealskin, with fleece and sheepskin used for the duffles, and for the mitts, which are made of sealskin, black leather, with sheepskin lining and a fox fur trim. (PHOTO/FACEBOOK)
The second-most popular photo on Facebook shows sealskin kamiks and mittens made by Kuujjuaq woman who has used her impressive traditional sewing skills to raise money for the Isuarsivik Treatment Centre. Samantha Ida David crafted kamiks and mitts which will be raffled off at the end of this month to support Isuarsivik's project to build a larger, modern facility. To help its fundraising efforts, she's now raffling the boots and mitts for $5 a ticket or five tickets for $20, with two draws to win. The draw will be called March 31 at 4 p.m. If you don't live in Kuujuaq, you can contact David on Facebook. EMTs are also accepted for the raffle tickets although you'll have to pay for the shipping if you win. David received donations from Tullik and Tivi Galleries in Kuujjuaq for the kamiks, which are a size 7 1/2 in tanned sealskin, with fleece and sheepskin used for the duffles, and for the mitts, which are made of sealskin, black leather, with sheepskin lining and a fox fur trim. (PHOTO/FACEBOOK)

Nunavut Senator Dennis Patterson said he won’t resign his seat this fall, news that become the most-read story of the week on Nunatsiaq Online.

Patterson’s March 14 comments to Nunatsiaq News came despite a promise he made in 2009 to quit the Senate after eight years.

Patterson, who was sworn in to the Senate on Sept. 15, 2009, is one of nine Conservative senators who Stephen Harper, then the prime minister, named to the Red Chamber in the late summer of that year.

All of those senators promised to serve only eight years, a period equal to the length of a term limit for senators that Harper wanted to legislate as part of a proposed Senate reform package.

But the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 2014 that under the Constitution, the federal government cannot change the Senate without obtaining the consent of at least seven provinces with at least 50 per cent of the population.

Because the legislated eight-year term limit fizzled, Patterson told Nunatsiaq News he intends to remain in the position for as long as current rules allow.

You can read the whole story here.

The second most-read story on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, according to Google Analytics whiuch tracks online traffic: according to Quttiktuq MLA Isaac Shooyook, words in the Child and Family Services Act that say “parents should use methods other than force by way of correction towards their children or in the discipline of their children” are in conflict with Inuit culture and should be removed.

Shooyook raised the issue with Family Services Minister Johnny Mike in question period March 9, asking if he would remove the words, saying they conflict with Inuit culture.

“I am of the firm belief that the wording in this section should be removed from legislation because our cultural beliefs dictate that children have to be lovingly corrected with a small slap, which I have advocated, but only in the context of traditional Inuit child disciplining laws and cultural practices,” Shooyook said.

You can read more of what Shooyook said, along with comments from Nunatsiaqonline.ca readers, here.

Also among the top five stories:

The Nunavut liquor board has fined two Iqaluit licence holders: The Elks, Navigator Inn’s Chartroom Lounge pleaded guilty to allowing intoxicated persons to remain on their premises;

A Nunavut man found guilty in a sexual assault case: A Nunavut judge ruled man had sex with unconscious—thus unconsenting—victim. In a judgment released March 8, Justice Neil Sharkey found the accused did not obtain consent to engage in sexual activity with a young woman; and,

A Nunavut man died after police-related shooting in Pond Inlet March 18: The Ottawa Police Service has been called in to investigate.

Vying for second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: Eric Langdon caught this unusual formation of Northern Lights, which he calls the Aurora Portal, March 3 from a view point at Aupalatuk Park near Cape Dorset. (PHOTO BY ERIC LANGDON)
Vying for second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: Eric Langdon caught this unusual formation of Northern Lights, which he calls the Aurora Portal, March 3 from a view point at Aupalatuk Park near Cape Dorset. (PHOTO BY ERIC LANGDON)
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