Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Around the Arctic June 27, 2016 - 1:15 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from June 19 to June 26

Dismissal of GN employee for harassment leads top five stories on Nunatsiaqonline.ca

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares: A full moon hangs over Frobisher Bay on the longest day of the year, June 21.  This marked the first year since 1967 that a full moon coincided with the summer solstice. According to star-gazing websites, the June full moon is known traditionally to the Algonquian peoples as the
The top photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares: A full moon hangs over Frobisher Bay on the longest day of the year, June 21. This marked the first year since 1967 that a full moon coincided with the summer solstice. According to star-gazing websites, the June full moon is known traditionally to the Algonquian peoples as the "strawberry moon," because it coincides with strawberry picking season. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
The second most-viewed photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: a painful example that reveals the human cost of Nunavut’s continuing social housing crisis, from Mary-Rose Angoshadluk and Erin-Dawn Pameolik of Rankin Inlet. This five-bedroom house in Rankin Inlet, completely surrounded by water, is home to an 80-year-old elder and five families, including seven children aged nine months to 12 years and eight other people.  “Every single year the house is surrounded by water which has caused mold due to moisture surrounding the house... With 16 people living under one roof and all the water surrounding it causes so much sickness.
The second most-viewed photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: a painful example that reveals the human cost of Nunavut’s continuing social housing crisis, from Mary-Rose Angoshadluk and Erin-Dawn Pameolik of Rankin Inlet. This five-bedroom house in Rankin Inlet, completely surrounded by water, is home to an 80-year-old elder and five families, including seven children aged nine months to 12 years and eight other people. “Every single year the house is surrounded by water which has caused mold due to moisture surrounding the house... With 16 people living under one roof and all the water surrounding it causes so much sickness. "Now, my question is what is the hamlet going to do about the surroundings? What is housing going to do with the shortage of houses? How long will it take for this to be fixed?” Erin-Dawn Pameolik wrote to Nunatsiaq News. The water was drained shortly afted this photo was posted. (PHOTO BY MARY-ROSE ANGOSHADLUK)

The most read of the top five stories on Nunatsiaqonline.ca last week, according to Google Analytics: a story on how a Government of Nunavut employee was dismissed after Nunavut ethics officer’s findings.

The ethics officer investigated a case of workplace sexual harassment that went on for seven years before the Government of Nunavut did anything about it.

Nunavut’s ethics officer Jeffrey Schnoor received 11 disclosures from GN public servants in 2015 — his first full year of operating in the territory — which he outlined in an annual report tabled at the legislative assembly earlier this month.

Only one of those 11 complaints were upheld.

In that case, Schnoor described incidents of sexual harassment directed at a woman employee over a period of seven years, which involved leering, wolf-whistles, “and, on at least one occasion, inappropriate touching.” You can read more here.

The other top four stories:

A Nunavut man, Peter Kingwatsiak, was sentenced to life in prison for murder, but Kingwatsiak plans to appeal his conviction in the death of Mappaluk Adla. The sentencing hearing, held in Cape Dorset’s community hall, was mostly a formality, since a conviction for first-degree murder carries an automatic life sentence. The sentence also means Kingwatsiak is not eligible for parole for 25 years.

• The Ottawa police exonerate Iqaluit RCMP member in cell block incident: A 16-month investigation by the Ottawa Police Service has cleared an Iqaluit RCMP member of using excessive force in a 2015 incident that made national headlines, Nunavut RCMP said June 22. “The independent investigation in this case concluded that the member involved was acting within the scope of his duties and did not exceed the use of force necessary to control an aggressive and assaultive prisoner,” said a June 22 news release from the Nunavut RCMP.

* A Kuujjuaq detainee throws himself from Nunavik police vehicle: The Sûreté du Québec has launched an investigation into the arrest of a Kuujjuaq man injured after throwing himself from a moving police cruiser June 17.

• A week-long search in a Nunavik community turns up no sign of missing man: A 20-year-old who fell into Akulivik river June 15 is presumed drowned.

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