Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut June 20, 2016 - 2:30 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from June 12 to June 19

Most read of the week — editorial by Jim Bell on bootlegging, Nunavut's new civil forfeiture act

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Top photo of the week on the Facebook page of Nunatsiaq News: Salluit's École Ikusik School graduates six proud students recently two of whom, Lucassie Amamatuak and Louisa Yuliusie, are fully trilingual. The other four students graduating this year were: Larry Tamusai, Maina Amamatuak, Thomas Usutaiyuk and Lydia Saviadjuk. Congratulations from Nunatsiaq News. (PHOTO COURTESY IAIN CAMPBELL)
Top photo of the week on the Facebook page of Nunatsiaq News: Salluit's École Ikusik School graduates six proud students recently two of whom, Lucassie Amamatuak and Louisa Yuliusie, are fully trilingual. The other four students graduating this year were: Larry Tamusai, Maina Amamatuak, Thomas Usutaiyuk and Lydia Saviadjuk. Congratulations from Nunatsiaq News. (PHOTO COURTESY IAIN CAMPBELL)

Here’s the article that the greatest number of readers at Nunatsiaqonline.ca wanted to read last week — an editorial from Nunatsiaq News editor Jim Bell on bootlegging and a proposed new Government of Nunavut law on the forfeiture of unlawful property.

“The local bootlegger is likely your friend and neighbor. He or she might even be a mayor or a hamlet councillor. Your local drug dealer might be a respected small business person or government worker.

“They’re not agents of the devil. They’re informal entrepreneurs who engage in a type of black market commerce that’s aimed at meeting a powerful pre-existing need. Many are working people attempting to supplement their incomes to cope with the high cost of living. This underground activity is neither moral nor immoral. It just is.

“This hasn’t stopped the Government of Nunavut from engaging in a great moral crusade, in the form of Bill 19, which contains a new law called the Unlawful Property Forfeiture Act.

You can read the entire editorial here.

The second-most read story on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, according to Google Analytics which tracks online readers, concerns shots fired late June 14 in Iqaluit.

That’s when police responded to a report of shots fired in Happy Valley, although it appears the man died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The RCMP does not typically report on suicides, but because the man was seen armed in a public space, police wanted to assure Iqaluit residents that there was no risk to their safety.

The top five stories of the week also include:

• An Igloolik man faces two charges after he allegedly hunted caribou on Baffin Island last year when a government moratorium was in effect.

Michael Irngaut, 24, faces two charges under the Nunavut Wildlife Act for harvesting a caribou on Feb. 15, 2015, when there was a temporary ban on Baffin Island caribou harvesting.

Ottawa police have completed an investigation of an alleged police beating in Iqaluit cell, but the local RCMP has yet to make findings public.

The Ottawa Police Service says it has handed over its investigation into a 2015 scuffle between a detainee and two RCMP officers in an Iqaluit cellblock.

Nunavut’s Polarman will star in new animated virtual reality film: “It’s going to be his story and he’s going to be the one telling it.”

Polarman, AKA Derek Emmons, is collaborating with Pinnguaq to create a short, animated virtual reality film about the life of Iqaluit’s homegrown superhero.

The second-most viewed photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page concerned the news that the Nunavut Impact Review Board has said no to Sabina Gold and Silver Corp.’s Back River gold mine proposal. The review board, in a 347-page final hearing report released around 6 p.m. Cambridge Bay time June 15, recommended that the Back River gold mine “not proceed at this time.”
The board, which heard from many Nunavut and Northwest Territories stakeholders at a public hearing held April 25 to April 30 in Cambridge Bay (seen here), said that’s because the mining project would produce environmental and social impacts that cannot be managed right now. You can read more about the decision in two stories on Nunatsiaqonline.ca. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)
The second-most viewed photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page concerned the news that the Nunavut Impact Review Board has said no to Sabina Gold and Silver Corp.’s Back River gold mine proposal. The review board, in a 347-page final hearing report released around 6 p.m. Cambridge Bay time June 15, recommended that the Back River gold mine “not proceed at this time.” The board, which heard from many Nunavut and Northwest Territories stakeholders at a public hearing held April 25 to April 30 in Cambridge Bay (seen here), said that’s because the mining project would produce environmental and social impacts that cannot be managed right now. You can read more about the decision in two stories on Nunatsiaqonline.ca. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)
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