Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Around the Arctic February 16, 2017 - 1:10 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Feb. 5 to Feb. 12

Swiss International jet repairs, closure of Iqaluit deli top the news

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The second most popular photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares, shows Prime Minister Justin Trudeau flanked by Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Natan Obed in sealskin and Carolyn Bennett, the minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, standing on the deck of Obed's house in Iqaluit  Feb. 9 for a final news conference before heading to Inuksuk High School for a public tea and bannock event.  Earlier Feb. 9, Obed and Trudeau signed an agreement to create an Inuit-Crown partnership committee made up of Inuit leaders and federal ministers. (PHOTO BY THOMAS ROHNER)
The second most popular photo of the week on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares, shows Prime Minister Justin Trudeau flanked by Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Natan Obed in sealskin and Carolyn Bennett, the minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, standing on the deck of Obed's house in Iqaluit Feb. 9 for a final news conference before heading to Inuksuk High School for a public tea and bannock event. Earlier Feb. 9, Obed and Trudeau signed an agreement to create an Inuit-Crown partnership committee made up of Inuit leaders and federal ministers. (PHOTO BY THOMAS ROHNER)
The most wlll-circulated photo of the past week was this hand-out photo of a recalled baby food pouch, which reached tens of thousands on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page. The message from Nunavut's health department was that if you have baby food that looks like this in your home, don't eat it. The food recall on one specific lot code of President’s Choice baby food pouches later then expanded to all pouches. That's because the pouches may contain Clostridium botulinum which can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, blurred or double vision, dry mouth, respiratory failure and paralysis. Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. (HANDOUT PHOTO)
The most wlll-circulated photo of the past week was this hand-out photo of a recalled baby food pouch, which reached tens of thousands on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page. The message from Nunavut's health department was that if you have baby food that looks like this in your home, don't eat it. The food recall on one specific lot code of President’s Choice baby food pouches later then expanded to all pouches. That's because the pouches may contain Clostridium botulinum which can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, blurred or double vision, dry mouth, respiratory failure and paralysis. Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. (HANDOUT PHOTO)

The saga of the stranded Swiss International Air Lines jet, which made an emergency landing on one engine Feb. 1 in Iqaluit, continued to lead the most-read story list on Nunatsiaqonline.ca.

That’s according to Google Analytics, which tracks our website’s online traffic.

A huge Antonov aircraft flew in a new engine to Iqaluit for Swiss International jet Feb. 4,

And then, Feb. 9, the repairs, carried out in frigid conditions on the tarmac of the Iqaluit airport, were finished, and the Swiss jet and then the Antonov heavy-lifter left Nunavut.

You can see many photos of the five-day-long engine transfer process on our Facebook page.

The second-most popular news story was more down to earth—the closure of an Iqaluit deli.

The Baffin Deli—located on the first floor if the Igluvut Building in downtown Iqaluit— provides take out sandwich and soup options as well as daily “hot lunch” specials, employing four full-time and two part-time employees, all but one of whom are Inuit.

Qikiqtaaluk Corp, the deli’s parent company, which has its office in the same building, said it couldn’t make the deli financially sustainable but offered no details as to when it would close.

You can read more details about what likely prompted the closure here.

Also among the top five stories of the week:

An Iqaluit man faces drug trafficking charges following his arrest by members of the Nunavut RCMP and the discovery of nearly 40 pounds of marijuana in his possession while he was travelling from Ottawa to Iqaluit, Feb. 4: Brian Czar has been charged with possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking and will appear before a judge at Nunavut’s Court of Justice in Iqaluit, May 15.

A Nunavut judge used a sentencing decision to blast Nunavut leaders for the longstanding need to deal with widespread alcohol abuse in the territory. Justice Paul Bychok sentenced Jamie Mikijuk, in custody since April 30, 2015, to another 372 days in a territorial prison. Mikijuk, 28, caused a 41-hour standoff in April 2015 when, “drunk,” “distraught,” and “suicidal,” he armed and barricaded himself inside his family home in the Happy Valley neighbourhood. For that, Mikijuk, who has no previous run-ins with police, must be sentenced to four years in prison, minus time served and other considerations, Bychok said. “But this court cannot ignore what brought Mr. Mikijuk before it,” the judge said.

Rankin Inlet said goodbye to three men who died when their snow machine fell through the ice: “I want to tell people that there is hope,” Catholic bishop said as community finally gathered Feb. 9 to say goodbye to Patrick Kaludjak and three relatives, James Mucpah Kaludjak, Billy Kaludjak and Corey Panika, were travelling by Bombardier snow machine from Rankin Inlet to Arviat Jan. 21 when their vehicle went through the sea ice near Whale Cove. Only Panika survived.

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