Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut December 13, 2016 - 2:30 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Dec. 4 to Dec. 11

Airline dispute leads the news

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, and one of the most popular photos of the year: A sun dog makes an appearance during Iqaluit's lunch hour, Dec. 5.  Sun dogs are created on especially cold days, when frozen air crystals in the lower atmosphere align and refract the sun's rays horizontally, creating the illusion of three points of light in the sky. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, and one of the most popular photos of the year: A sun dog makes an appearance during Iqaluit's lunch hour, Dec. 5. Sun dogs are created on especially cold days, when frozen air crystals in the lower atmosphere align and refract the sun's rays horizontally, creating the illusion of three points of light in the sky. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
The second most-popular photo of the weekend on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows Jeffrey Sather of Cambridge Bay standing beside his latest work of art, an icy inuksuk, which he built on his deck. After a warmer-than-usual November, temperatures have since taken a tumble. (PHOTO BY DENISE LEBLEU IMAGES)
The second most-popular photo of the weekend on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows Jeffrey Sather of Cambridge Bay standing beside his latest work of art, an icy inuksuk, which he built on his deck. After a warmer-than-usual November, temperatures have since taken a tumble. (PHOTO BY DENISE LEBLEU IMAGES)

Nunavut’s new airline war continued to draw thousands of readers to the Nunatsiaq News website.

In the latest story, the leader in the top five stories of the week, Steve Hankirk, the president of Canadian North, said former partner First Air’s decision to abruptly end its controversial codeshare relationship with his company was as much of a surprise for him as it was for the rest of Nunavut.

In the wake of that unexpected announcement, Hankirk said the two previously chummy airlines now have what you might call irreconcilable differences.

Hankirk said he received no prior notice from First Air about the decision and learned about it through a news release, while sitting across a table from none other than First Air President Brock Friesen.

You can read more here.
The second of the top five stories, according to Google Analytics which tracks online traffic: how sexist remarks at a Winnipeg research gala shocked and disturbed northern scientists.

Sexist, inappropriate comments made during an ArcticNet gala celebration in Winnipeg Dec. 7 prompted two open letters denouncing the speech and a call for ArcticNet’s board of directors to address long-standing issues of sexism in the organization, and in northern research.

ArcticNet, an elite network of publicly funded researchers and academics, held its annual meeting in Winnipeg last week to showcase Arctic research.

Young researchers were particularly offended when Russell Shearer took the podium at the gala to recognize outgoing executive director Martin Fortier for his long service to ArcticNet.

According to Natalie Baird, who wrote an open letter to ArcticNet that is signed by several dozen students and other ArcticNet supporters, Shearer made a “locker room” type speech about his colleague and friend Fortier.

You can read more about this here.
Also among the top five stories:

Audio-interview rejected: A Nunavut judge found that an audio-only interview with a 14-year-old sexual abuse complainant from Pond Inlet who died in March 2016 was too unreliable to be used in court. Nunavut Justice Paul Bychok said in a decision released Dec. 7 said the investigating officer on the case failed a number of “basic” best practices

Nunavut school truancy rates are getting worse: Over 10 years, territorial truancy rate rose by 37.6 per cent

A Nunavut judge threw out four historic sex charges against a Cape Dorset man after finding lawyers took too much time to resolve the matter in court.

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