Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut August 18, 2017 - 11:45 am

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Aug. 6 to Aug. 13

Conviction of Cape Dorset business owner for sea can theft and arson the week's top story

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, shows the new Iqaluit International Airport terminal which opened its doors Aug. 9. While the terminal will handle all aircraft traffic going forward, the grand opening ceremony for the facility isn't scheduled until September. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, shows the new Iqaluit International Airport terminal which opened its doors Aug. 9. While the terminal will handle all aircraft traffic going forward, the grand opening ceremony for the facility isn't scheduled until September. (PHOTO BY STEVE DUCHARME)

One thing becomes clear after looking at the top five stories last week on Nunatsiaqonline.ca: our readers are interested in the justice system—from court decisions to policing.

The most-read story of the week examined how a Nunavut man was jailed for sabotaging an ex-MLA’s business.

A Cape Dorset business owner, Jamesie Alariaq, received an 18-month prison sentence for stealing and burning a sealift container in 2014 that belonged to a rival business owned by former Nunavut MLA and cabinet minister Fred Schell.

In November last year, a jury convicted Alariaq of one count of arson and one count of theft for using a CAT loader to steal the sea can during the night of Aug. 30, 2014, and drive it to a remote location where he set it on fire.

The sea can held equipment valued at more than $77,000 and was owned by Schell’s Polar Supplies Ltd., a company that competed locally with businesses owned by Alariaq and his family members.

In a sentencing decision delivered in Cape Dorset, July 25, Justice Todd Ducharme said Alariaq’s intention was clear when he stole the sea can because he observed the container “with interest” for days prior to the theft.

You can read the entire story here.

The second most-read story of the past week, according to Google Analytics, which tracks online traffic on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, discussed the recommendations of an inquest looking into the 2013 death of Victor Kaludjak.

A coroner’s jury said Nunavut’s health department must develop stronger guidelines for emergency treatment, documentation of care and proper training for practitioners, according to recommendations released Aug. 4 from the Chief Coroner of Nunavut.

Kaludjak was admitted to the Kivalliq Health Centre at 10:30 a.m. on March 20, 2013, suffering from double vision, muscle weakness and an unstable gait.

After he suffered a cardiac arrest at around midnight, staff at the centre gave him CPR and called for a medevac, which took him to Winnipeg at around 2 a.m. March 21. He died at the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre at 11:02 a.m. that day.

You can read more here.

Another story drew in many readers—it touched on tips the RCMP gave to women to protect themselves against sexual assault.

The Nunavut RCMP issued a list of suggestions to women on how to be “vigilant and keep safe” after an Aug. 5 incident in Clyde River.

“We know women aren’t to blame for tragic assaults, but we nevertheless want to make sure we’re doing everything in our power to stay safe,” Inspector Dean Warr said in an Aug. 8 news release.

Warr’s statement came after RCMP members in Clyde River arrested Mark Paneak, 21, of Clyde River Aug. 5 and charged him with sexual assault, break-and-enter and resisting arrest.

But the Nunavut RCMP then apologized for the statement Aug. 9 saying that the suggested safety tips were useful for anyone, not just women.

“Keeping our residents safe is always our top priority, regardless of one’s gender… we should not have implied that females should be especially vigilant and take extra precautions,” the RCMP said. “Absolutely no offense was intended, and we wholeheartedly apologize.”

Also in the top five: the continuing legal saga of the Waters’ Edge restaurant and Kickin’ Caribou pub. A Nunavut judge said the Iqaluit restaurant can operate for another month, while an appeal over a lease agreement continues in court.

If you away during July, you can catch up with the top story’s of that month here.

The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows a satellite image of a sizeable wildfire burning in Greenland,, about 150 kilometres northeast of the community of Sisimiut. Satellite sensors first detected evidence of the fire July 31—and the fire is still burning this week. NASA said that a preliminary analysis of satellite images suggests far more fire activity in Greenland in 2017 during any other year since the sensor began collecting data in 2002. The fire appears to be burning through peat. (PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA)
The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows a satellite image of a sizeable wildfire burning in Greenland,, about 150 kilometres northeast of the community of Sisimiut. Satellite sensors first detected evidence of the fire July 31—and the fire is still burning this week. NASA said that a preliminary analysis of satellite images suggests far more fire activity in Greenland in 2017 during any other year since the sensor began collecting data in 2002. The fire appears to be burning through peat. (PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA)
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