Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut September 07, 2017 - 4:00 pm

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from Aug. 27 to Sept. 3

Reorganization of INAC leads last week's news among online readers

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, shows the Maud, sailed by Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen's sunken starting its long journey from Cambridge Bay back to Norway at about 9 a.m. Aug. 29, on top of a barge and towed by the Tandberg Polar tug boat. The Maud, which sank from its moorings 86 years ago, was eventually raised with huge inflatables, left in dry dock over winter so the wood could dry out, and is now bound for Greenland where the Maud Returns Home team hopes to let the Maud overwinter one more time before taking it across the Atlantic Ocean to Vøllen, Norway, where it was built. The Maud was built for Amundsen's second expedition to the Arctic 100 years ago but the trip through the Northwest Passage took six years and Maud ended up in Nome, Alaska, where it was sold to the Hudson's Bay Co. (PHOTO BY DENISE LEBLEU IMAGES)
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, based on views, likes and shares, shows the Maud, sailed by Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen's sunken starting its long journey from Cambridge Bay back to Norway at about 9 a.m. Aug. 29, on top of a barge and towed by the Tandberg Polar tug boat. The Maud, which sank from its moorings 86 years ago, was eventually raised with huge inflatables, left in dry dock over winter so the wood could dry out, and is now bound for Greenland where the Maud Returns Home team hopes to let the Maud overwinter one more time before taking it across the Atlantic Ocean to Vøllen, Norway, where it was built. The Maud was built for Amundsen's second expedition to the Arctic 100 years ago but the trip through the Northwest Passage took six years and Maud ended up in Nome, Alaska, where it was sold to the Hudson's Bay Co. (PHOTO BY DENISE LEBLEU IMAGES)

“Bye, bye INAC: Trudeau to split department into two pieces”—that was the headline of the story that drew the greatest number of readers to Nunatsiaq News this past week.

Declaring that “existing colonial structures” do not work, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Aug. 28 that the federal government department known as Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada will be dissolved and replaced by two new entities to be handled by two cabinet ministers.

“I’m tremendously excited by this meaningful step,” Trudeau told reporters at a web-streamed news conference in front of Rideau Hall.

Carolyn Bennett, who has been known since the fall of 2015 as the minister of INAC, gets a new job title: minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs.

At the same time, Jane Philpott, who until Aug. 28 served as national health minister, moves to a new portfolio: minister of Indigenous Services.

Philpott’s task will be to oversee the services that Ottawa still delivers directly to many Indigenous peoples, especially First Nations.

The INAC department is a colonial structure that was designed primarily to implement the Indian Act, “a colonial, paternalistic law,” a statement from the prime minister’s office said.

You can read more about INAC’s reorganization here as well as some reaction from the northern premiers.

The second most-read story of the week, according to Google Analytics, which tracks online readership on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, looked at how municipal and territorial governments remain concerned following the release of a Competition Bureau investigation that failed to find sufficient evidence for anti-competitive behaviour at Nunavut’s two biggest airlines.

The city and GN filed formal complaints with the bureau against Nunavut’s three main airlines as early as 2015, citing decreases in passenger service, frequent cargo delays and botched medical travel arising from a series of code sharing and service deals between the companies.

The Competition Bureau’s three-pronged investigation dismissed allegations of anti-competitive behavior in the Kivalliq between First Air and Calm Air.

The report also said the bureau dropped its investigation into the heavily criticized codeshare between First Air and Canadian North—mainly because the airlines cancelled the policy shortly after the bureau filed court requests for company records.

But while not assigning any wrong-doing, the bureau admitted that alleged predatory pricing by First Air and Canadian North likely affected the upstart flight operator, Go Sarvaq, which was pushed out of the Iqaluit-Ottawa flight market before their first flight ever left the tarmac.

You can read the whole story here.

And also in the news:

the Nunavut RCMP made contact with a Cape Dorset fugitive, saying they were negotiating with David Mikkigak, 37, who has evaded police for seven weeks. The Nunavut RCMP said late Aug. 28 that they are working with Mikkigak’s family, “with a goal of having him surrender peacefully;”

a body was discovered following an Iqaluit boat fire, although police said no foul play was involved in the fatal Aug. 31 fire. Sources later confirmed to Nunatsiaq News that it was Jacopie Akpalialuk, who sometimes lived in the boat; and,

a letter writer asks whether Inuit corporations be re-evaluated: “Are they there for all Inuit? Or just the greedy staff and boards of these organizations?”

The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows three Iqaluit youth, Paul Gibbons, Jimmy Nukiguak and Emma Inookee who completed a Junior Fire Fighter Course Aug. 28, run by the City of Iqaluit.
The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page shows three Iqaluit youth, Paul Gibbons, Jimmy Nukiguak and Emma Inookee who completed a Junior Fire Fighter Course Aug. 28, run by the City of Iqaluit. "It was an amazing opportunity. Not only did we learn how to put out a fire, and about forced entries, we also learned about leadership and working as a team," 20-year-old Inookee said. She's heading back to school in a few days but told Nunatsiaq News, "I would like to put in my application to become a volunteer fire fighter for Iqaluit." The youth also learned about command structure, radio communications, search and rescue and the importance of physical fitness, said deputy fire chief Stéphane Dionne. (PHOTOS BY BETH BROWN)
Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share

 THIS WEEK’S ADS

 ADVERTISING