Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut April 27, 2017 - 8:30 am

What you read on Nunatsiaqonline.ca from April 16 to April 23

Music and marijuana law changes lead the week's most-read stories

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares: A zamboni driver cleans off one of two skating rinks on a foggy April 4 morning on Williamson Lake in Rankin Inlet. (PHOTO BY PUTULIK PHOTOGRAPHY)
The most popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page, according to views, likes and shares: A zamboni driver cleans off one of two skating rinks on a foggy April 4 morning on Williamson Lake in Rankin Inlet. (PHOTO BY PUTULIK PHOTOGRAPHY)
The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: Snow buntings have returned to at least some parts of the Arctic after their winter holiday in southern Canada and the northern United States. This one was spotted with a flock of others in Sanikiluaq, on the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay, April 10. (PHOTO BY SARAH MEEKO)
The second most-popular photo on the Nunatsiaq News Facebook page: Snow buntings have returned to at least some parts of the Arctic after their winter holiday in southern Canada and the northern United States. This one was spotted with a flock of others in Sanikiluaq, on the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay, April 10. (PHOTO BY SARAH MEEKO)

Forget about crime: this week readers of Nunatsiaq News were keen to read about music and marijuana, as well as Prince Charles and Camilla, among other things.

The top most-read story of the week, according to Google Analytics which tracks traffic on Nunatsiaqonline.ca, talked about a Nunavut pop star’s new album.

Kelly Fraser’s politically-charged second album Sedna came out April 25. The young singer and songwriter from Sanikiluaq said she made the album to empower other Inuit.

The 11-track, English and Inuktitut-language album is filled to the brim with Fraser’s ideas, her fears and her hopes for Nunavut and her fellow Inuit.

You can read the whole story here.

And if you’re in Toronto April 28 you can see Fraser perform at the Centre for Social Innovation at 192 Spadina Avenue on April 28 at 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Admission for Inuit will be free, Fraser said on Facebook: “Please everyone in Toronto come and support me and listen to me perform my new album, it will be my first full performance playing my new songs.”

Then, readers followed the story of how a Brooklyn-based band called Eskimeaux changed its name, days after throat singer Tanya Tagaq criticized the group for using what she called a slur against Inuit.

“You are not an Eskimo,” Tagaq tweeted to the group on Twitter last week, ahead of a show the band played in Toronto April 17.

“Canadians should show them how much they appreciate hipster bands using slurs to sell music.”

Eskimeaux is headed by singer and songwriter Gabrielle Smith, who previously explained that the band’s name came from her own ancestry. The musician was adopted but described her birth father as a “Tlingit Eskimo.” The group now calls itself Ó.

Also in the news: an editorial on the Trudeau government’s plan to see Parliament pass Bill C-45 and Bill C-46 on the legalization of marijuana in time for the new laws to take effect July 1, 2018, the date when Nunavut would be expected to do its part in carrying out Ottawa’s agenda.

Here you can see the Liberal’s government’s cannabis package and what’s in it.

Also in the top five:

A Nunavut judge told the Government of Nunavut to pay up after lawyers miss a filing deadline: Because justice department lawyers screwed up a mandatory 30-day filing deadline, the Government of Nunavut must pay $9,969.79 plus $100 in costs to an Arctic Bay woman, Justice Neil Sharkey ruled in a judgment released April 13. The woman, Irene Swoboda, had used her own money in January 2016 to pay for medical travel to Ottawa for a diagnostic procedure she receives every year.

A Royal visit to Nunavut is in the works: Charles, the Prince of Wales, and Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, will undertake a royal tour from June 29 to July 1 which will bring them to Ontario and Nunavut. Although it hasn’t been official announced, they’re expected to be in Cambridge Bay, July 1, to officially open the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.

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