Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut September 23, 2013 - 7:07 am

Western Nunavut community embraces radio operator training course

"This training course is a priority for us"

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Volunteers  of the Kugluktuk Radio Society hold their certificate of achievement for the Nunavut Community Radio Operators course. From back left, Donna Pangon, Caitline and Sheila Lengenberg, Doris Elatiak, Mike Webster (front row) Chad Hayohok and Steven Kiayogana. (PHOTO COURTESY OF KRS)
Volunteers of the Kugluktuk Radio Society hold their certificate of achievement for the Nunavut Community Radio Operators course. From back left, Donna Pangon, Caitline and Sheila Lengenberg, Doris Elatiak, Mike Webster (front row) Chad Hayohok and Steven Kiayogana. (PHOTO COURTESY OF KRS)

Members of the Kugluktuk Radio Society are reaching out beyond the airwaves.

Society members recently helped test-drive the Nunavut Community Radio Operators course, developed by the Nunavut Municipal Training Organization.

The course for radio operators came as a follow-up to complaints received by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission about broadcasts on Nunavut community radio stations.

The Kugluktuk Radio Society was asked to review and provide feedback on the course, which will launch next month.

Mike Webster, the society’s executive director, called the course “an excellent learning and sharing opportunity.”

“The website is easy to use and has some amazing features for operators to engage with one another,” Webster said in a recent news release. “It was an honor to be involved to help out however we could. Ultimately, it helps an important and sometimes undervalued sector in Nunavut’s economy.”

The course is presented as part of the Aarluk Moodle suite—  an online system for delivering Arctic College programs.

Now, another 15 radio society volunteers will take the soon-to-be public course, which runs from October 2013 to June 2014.

The radio society is making arrangements to use the computer lab at Kugluktuk’s Arctic College to help deliver the course in Kugluktuk.

“As volunteers with a commitment to growing an organization and the community radio sector, we can only do so much and there are only so many hours in the day,” said Donna Pangon, president of the society, “which is why we encourage members of the public to start other stations if they don’t like the range of formats already available — choice is good; so, this training course is a priority for us.”

The society has approached Nunavut’s education department to have the 45-hour course recognized as a high school credit.

The community radio broadcasts at 88.7 FM, airing both music and live talk shows.

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