Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Around the Arctic February 14, 2014 - 10:39 am

Twice-yearly sun transit problem to hit the North Feb. 21 to March 7

Phenomenon creates temporary satellite comms failures

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Between Feb. 21 and March 7, short, temporary disruptions will hit all satellite communications in northern 
Canada, during the twice-yearly sun transit period. (FILE PHOTO)
Between Feb. 21 and March 7, short, temporary disruptions will hit all satellite communications in northern Canada, during the twice-yearly sun transit period. (FILE PHOTO)

People in northern Canada who depend on satellite signals for long distance phone, internet and television services will notice temporary disruptions between Feb. 21 and March 7 this year, Northwestel said Feb. 13 in an announcement.

The sun transit problem hits the North twice a year when satellites pass directly between the sun and earth-based satellite dishes.

This creates radio-frequency noise that overwhelms satellite signals.

In Nunavut and Nunavik, where virtually all communication systems are dependent on satellites, people will see short, temporary outages every afternoon during the sun transit period.

In the eastern time zone, people will notice service degradation some time between 2:22 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. every day from Feb. 21 to March 7.

In the mountain time zone, people will notice the problem between 12:22 and 1:00 p.m.

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