Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Iqaluit February 19, 2013 - 4:16 pm

Nunavut LEAP society seeks youth for ski adventure leadership training

"A really intensive seven-day training"

SAMANTHA DAWSON
Nunavut Youth LEAP Society’s ski adventure leadership training includes a certification program in wilderness first aid. (PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAP)
Nunavut Youth LEAP Society’s ski adventure leadership training includes a certification program in wilderness first aid. (PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAP)
Participants in Nunavut Youth LEAP Society’s 2012 ski adventure leadership training go skiing around Iqaluit. (PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAP)
Participants in Nunavut Youth LEAP Society’s 2012 ski adventure leadership training go skiing around Iqaluit. (PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAP)

If you are interested in skiing, or starting a ski program in your community, the Nunavut Youth LEAP Society’s ski adventure leadership training could be for you.

The society, which hosts short ski excursions for Iqaluit youth during the spring, is offering ski training from March 14 to 20 in Iqaluit, for anyone between the ages of 19 and 35 who may want to start a ski program. 

The training, funded by the Government of Nunavut, will cover cross-country skiing technique, navigation, wilderness first aid, and group leadership skills, and “it’s a really intensive seven-day training,” said Maxine Carroll, one of the founders of the society said.

The Nunavut Youth LEAP Society, which stands for “learning experiences adventure programming,” started in 2010, taking over from a cross-country skiing program known as Skiqaluit, which started in 2005.

LEAP runs overnight ski trips with Inuksuk High School Aqsarniit Middle School students, with the students learning how to plan and prepare for the trips.

Since LEAP started, over 1,000 youth have participated in the ski programs, which included a long distance trip to Kimmirut from Iqaluit.

As well, Nunavut LEAP is now working with the Makkuttukkuvik Youth Centre in Iqaluit to offer ski excursions twice a week to Iqaluit youth.

“The idea behind it is to really get youth active on the land, and push their limits, discover some of their strength that they might not have discovered before, and just to try something new,” Carroll said.

The goal is “to reach young people and community members who may be unemployed or disengaged in the formal school system, and who may benefit from the positive personal development that is a big part of adventure programs.”

Ski equipment will be provided, but prior skiing strongly experience is recommended, Carroll added, but it’s not required to do the ski adventure leadership training — also known by its acronym, SALT.

SALT training could lead to seasonal contracts and apprenticeships with the society, she said.

Anyone interested in the training can .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for an application form which must be returned by Feb. 28.

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