Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Iqaluit June 12, 2013 - 4:10 pm

Telesat to donate money to IBC’s future Nunavut media centre

"It’s fitting they have given us this boost of encouragement and we are very grateful"

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Estimated to cost $8 to $10 million, the new media arts centre, spearheaded by the Inuit Broadcasting Corp., would provide Nunavut’s first full-scale, state-of-the-art, digital recording and production facilities. (FILE PHOTO)
Estimated to cost $8 to $10 million, the new media arts centre, spearheaded by the Inuit Broadcasting Corp., would provide Nunavut’s first full-scale, state-of-the-art, digital recording and production facilities. (FILE PHOTO)

Telesat Canada, the satellite communications company, will make a donation to the Inuit Broadcasting Corp.‘s Nunavut Media Arts Centre fundraising campaign, an IBC news release said July 12.

No dollar amount for the donation was given: IBC only said the donation would be for an “undisclosed amount.”

The IBC campaign, also known as “Johnny the lemming needs a new home!” campaign, aims to raise money for Nunavut’s first “full-scale, state of the art, digital audio video, recording, performance and post-production facility” in Iqaluit, which will cost at least $8 million to build.

IBC’s relationship with Telesat goes back to 1980 when the Inukshuk project began broadcasting via Telesat’s Anik B Satellite.

“It’s fitting they have given us this boost of encouragement and we are very grateful. Telesat’s support provides meaningful progress towards our goal of ensuring the NMAC [Nunavut Media Arts Centre] becomes a reality,” said Madeleine d’Argencourt, the chairperson of IBC.

Based in Ottawa, Telesat provides satellite communications in the North and other places in the world. 

And Telesat recognizes the importance of IBC’s activities when it comes to developing Inuit language programming in Nunavut, the IBC release said.

“We have been actively involved in [Nunavut] for decades and believe it can prosper through access to the latest technologies, whether satellite delivered broadband like Telesat demonstrated last fall in Nunavut, or having an up-to-date facility like the Nunavut Media Arts Centre,” Paul Bush, Telesat’s senior vice-president of corporate and business development said in the release.

Telesat is “ready to bring state-of-the-art communications to this community, and Telesat’s contribution supports our vision of making Nunavut all it can be,” he said.

With a digital, high definition studio and editing capabilities, the new centre will attract freelancers, production companies, and other broadcasters to work in Nunavut, “creating a host of unprecedented opportunities for Nunavut talent,” the release said.

The campaign has been raising money to complete construction of the $8.3 million centre by 2015.

The centre was previously scheduled to open in Iqaluit in 2013, when it was estimated to cost about $10 million.

In 2012, IBC received $164,000 from Ottawa over two years towards the management of its new centre

Applications to territorial and federal programs and the establishment of public and private partnerships are ongoing.

Donations can be made on the campaign website.

The website also includes a downloadable donor recognition program.

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