Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut June 23, 2017 - 7:30 am

Photo: Willow ptarmigan struts his stuff near Baker Lake

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Wait, is that a chicken on the tundra? Sure looks like one. The willow ptarmigan, the largest of the three Arctic ptarmigan species, struts his stuff on the land north of Baker Lake June 15 in an area more prone to rock ptarmigan. Members of the grouse family, the rock, willow and white-tailed ptarmigan all live in the Arctic and figure prominently in Inuit culture, diet and legend. With their feathered feet and constantly changing plumage, the birds are experts at northern survival. Willow ptarmigan males are unique among their ptarmigan and grouse cousins for staying close with, and guarding, their mates during egg incubation and for sticking around to help rear the young. (PHOTO BY LARS QAQQAQ)
Wait, is that a chicken on the tundra? Sure looks like one. The willow ptarmigan, the largest of the three Arctic ptarmigan species, struts his stuff on the land north of Baker Lake June 15 in an area more prone to rock ptarmigan. Members of the grouse family, the rock, willow and white-tailed ptarmigan all live in the Arctic and figure prominently in Inuit culture, diet and legend. With their feathered feet and constantly changing plumage, the birds are experts at northern survival. Willow ptarmigan males are unique among their ptarmigan and grouse cousins for staying close with, and guarding, their mates during egg incubation and for sticking around to help rear the young. (PHOTO BY LARS QAQQAQ)

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