Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut January 20, 2017 - 11:30 am

Photo: Tulugak… Arctic survivor

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
When it's -36 C and 40 kilometre-an-hour winds are making it feel like -56 C, humans and beasts find ways to stay warm, as did this frosty raven in Rankin Inlet Jan. 12, perched on a satellite dish support wire and scooched up close to a home. Ravens are notorious Arctic survivors, able to live through the fiercest storms. According to birding websites, ravens take advantage of limited warmth in winter by turning their backs to the sun during brief daylight hours so their black feathers can absorb heat. Ravens and other corvids have a higher body temperature than humans due to their higher metabolism. You'll often see ravens
When it's -36 C and 40 kilometre-an-hour winds are making it feel like -56 C, humans and beasts find ways to stay warm, as did this frosty raven in Rankin Inlet Jan. 12, perched on a satellite dish support wire and scooched up close to a home. Ravens are notorious Arctic survivors, able to live through the fiercest storms. According to birding websites, ravens take advantage of limited warmth in winter by turning their backs to the sun during brief daylight hours so their black feathers can absorb heat. Ravens and other corvids have a higher body temperature than humans due to their higher metabolism. You'll often see ravens "tucking" or crouching down over their feet, and "fluffing," where they puff up their feathers to retain body heat. (PHOTO BY PUTULIK PHOTOGRAPHY)

Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share

 THIS WEEK’S ADS

 ADVERTISING