Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Iqaluit January 20, 2017 - 7:30 am

Photo: The first time Hollywood came north

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Holding her original script from the 1974 Hollywood film The White Dawn, Ann Meekitjuk-Hanson speaks to a small audience who had assembled Jan. 19 to watch the film at the Unikkaarvik Visitor Centre in Iqaluit. Hanson was a young mother in Frobisher Bay in 1974, part of the first generation of children to move to larger settlements and go to English schools, and she was enticed to act in the film. It was a time of social unrest in Frobisher Bay, Hanson told the audience—lots of gossip, gambling and family breakdown. The White Dawn, based on a true story of southern whalers in 1896 who get separated from their crew and are saved by Inuit, helped Inuit actors and others relearn the culture, skills and language that were being lost, she said. Read more later on Nunatsiaqonline.ca. (PHOTO BY LISA GREGOIRE)
Holding her original script from the 1974 Hollywood film The White Dawn, Ann Meekitjuk-Hanson speaks to a small audience who had assembled Jan. 19 to watch the film at the Unikkaarvik Visitor Centre in Iqaluit. Hanson was a young mother in Frobisher Bay in 1974, part of the first generation of children to move to larger settlements and go to English schools, and she was enticed to act in the film. It was a time of social unrest in Frobisher Bay, Hanson told the audience—lots of gossip, gambling and family breakdown. The White Dawn, based on a true story of southern whalers in 1896 who get separated from their crew and are saved by Inuit, helped Inuit actors and others relearn the culture, skills and language that were being lost, she said. Read more later on Nunatsiaqonline.ca. (PHOTO BY LISA GREGOIRE)

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