Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Iqaluit July 17, 2017 - 7:30 am

Photo: It’s not rocket science… or is it?

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
The federal science minister, Kirsty Duncan, works with budding rocket scientists at an Actua day camp in Iqaluit, July 21. The camp wrapped up the minister's recent northern trip, which began July 17 in Resolute. Duncan is the first minister of science to meet with working scientists in Canada's most northern regions. In Iqaluit she met with elders to talk about the importance of using traditional knowledge within scientific endeavours. A scientist herself, Duncan contributed to research for a UN climate change panel that was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize, and led a medical research project in Norway, where her love for the North began.
The federal science minister, Kirsty Duncan, works with budding rocket scientists at an Actua day camp in Iqaluit, July 21. The camp wrapped up the minister's recent northern trip, which began July 17 in Resolute. Duncan is the first minister of science to meet with working scientists in Canada's most northern regions. In Iqaluit she met with elders to talk about the importance of using traditional knowledge within scientific endeavours. A scientist herself, Duncan contributed to research for a UN climate change panel that was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize, and led a medical research project in Norway, where her love for the North began. "Here in the North, science is part of the culture," Duncan told Nunatsiaq News July 21. With her in the photo are nine-year-old scientists Jacob Avingaq, left, and Sakhile Matshazi, right. See story later on nunatsiaqonline.ca. (PHOTO BY BETH BROWN)

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