Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut August 16, 2012 - 7:58 am

Photo: Inuit firm handles Cape Dyer DEW line cleanup

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Cleanup worker Moses Akpalialuk, Nunavut Environment Minister James Arreak, Arreak's deputy minister, David Akeeagok, and George Eckalook, vice president of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, stand in front of about 6,500 metric tonnes of bagged PCBs and hazardous waste Aug. 15 that is waiting to be shipped out from the Cape Dyer DEW line site, where
Qikiqtaaluk Logistics is cleaning up a big mess left behind from the 1950s and 1960s, most of it paint, oil and gas spills. About half of the PCB material has been taken from the site. There were 63 DEW stations stretching from Alaska to Labrador set up by NORAD during the Cold War. Cape Dyer, controlled by the Department of National Defence, is the most easterly projection of Baffin Island into Davis Strait. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
Cleanup worker Moses Akpalialuk, Nunavut Environment Minister James Arreak, Arreak's deputy minister, David Akeeagok, and George Eckalook, vice president of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, stand in front of about 6,500 metric tonnes of bagged PCBs and hazardous waste Aug. 15 that is waiting to be shipped out from the Cape Dyer DEW line site, where Qikiqtaaluk Logistics is cleaning up a big mess left behind from the 1950s and 1960s, most of it paint, oil and gas spills. About half of the PCB material has been taken from the site. There were 63 DEW stations stretching from Alaska to Labrador set up by NORAD during the Cold War. Cape Dyer, controlled by the Department of National Defence, is the most easterly projection of Baffin Island into Davis Strait. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)

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