Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Around the Arctic August 07, 2012 - 4:46 am

Photo: Ice extent approaches 2007 low record, graph shows

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
This graph from the National Ice and Snow Data Center shows that 2012 ice extent is headed to a record low, despite the ice that's been jammed into Frobisher Bay. The ice extent recorded for Aug. 1 of 6.53 million square kilometres is the lowest in the satellite record, the NSIDC said Aug. 6. The previous record for the same date was set in 2007 at 6.64 million sq. km., when the current record low September ice extent was set. Arctic sea ice extent for July 2012 was the second lowest in the satellite record, behind 2011. On Aug. 1, ice extent was just below levels recorded for the same date in 2007, the year that saw the record minimum ice extent in September. Low sea ice concentrations are present over large parts of the western Arctic Ocean, said the NSIDC, with warm conditions dominating the weather for most of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding lands. For a brief period in early July, nearly all of the Greenland ice sheet experienced surface melt, a rare event, the NSIDC said. Read more about the what the NSIDC said on Nunatsiaqonline.ca. (GRAPH COURTESY OF THE NSIDC)
This graph from the National Ice and Snow Data Center shows that 2012 ice extent is headed to a record low, despite the ice that's been jammed into Frobisher Bay. The ice extent recorded for Aug. 1 of 6.53 million square kilometres is the lowest in the satellite record, the NSIDC said Aug. 6. The previous record for the same date was set in 2007 at 6.64 million sq. km., when the current record low September ice extent was set. Arctic sea ice extent for July 2012 was the second lowest in the satellite record, behind 2011. On Aug. 1, ice extent was just below levels recorded for the same date in 2007, the year that saw the record minimum ice extent in September. Low sea ice concentrations are present over large parts of the western Arctic Ocean, said the NSIDC, with warm conditions dominating the weather for most of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding lands. For a brief period in early July, nearly all of the Greenland ice sheet experienced surface melt, a rare event, the NSIDC said. Read more about the what the NSIDC said on Nunatsiaqonline.ca. (GRAPH COURTESY OF THE NSIDC)

Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share

 THIS WEEK’S ADS

 ADVERTISING


        


Custom Search