Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut September 26, 2012 - 3:17 pm

Nunavut Trade Show pitches jobs to high school kids

“It’s kind of a lot better than just going to the trade show”

SAMANTHA DAWSON
Cpl. Beryl Lewis explains police work to Inuksuk High School students at the Nunavut Trade Show youth session at the Frobisher Inn Sept. 26. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
Cpl. Beryl Lewis explains police work to Inuksuk High School students at the Nunavut Trade Show youth session at the Frobisher Inn Sept. 26. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)

The Nunavut Trade Show and Conference started something new this year – offering a conference session for youth in Iqaluit.

About 40 Inuksuk High School students gathered at the Frobisher Inn to listen to pitches from different organizations and to ask them questions.

The goal: to provide information about jobs and training opportunities.

Among the organizations presenting during the session was the Baffinland Iron Mines Corp.

And it gave Greg Missal, Baffinland’s vice president of corporate affairs, a chance to tell the group about Baffinland’s Mary River project.

Missal said the idea behind big mining projects is to “minimize [the] environmental impact” — and help people.

“It’s pretty significant dollars, so we’re hoping it can make a difference,” Missal said in response to a question from a student about how the mine would benefit Inuit organizations.

The students also heard from the Government of Nunavut and their summer student program.

That talk included advice on job interviews and resumes.

“We can always help to make it a little bit easier,” Salome Akumalik Qaunaq told them.

There are a variety of jobs available to students who want to work with the GN, she said.

A representative of the Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland told students about the degree programs they can take in nautical science, marine engineering, food technology and naval architecture.

Beryl Lewis, a corporal in the RCMP “V” division in Iqaluit, fielded questions from the youth about police officer training.

“If I want to be an RCMP member, I’ve got to be going for a run tonight,” she said, stressing the physical fitness required for the job.

The youth programs that the RCMP runs are, “good ways for you guys to get into the policing world,” he said.

Lewis, the co-ordinator for the Nunavut experience program and the popular youth academy program, says training at the RCMP depot in Regina also gives young people a taste of what it’s like to be a member of the RCMP.

Daniel Emmons, a Grade 12 student at Inuksuk, said the presentations could help him to make decisions about what to do after high school.

“It’s kind of a lot better than just going to the trade show — it’s the same thing, it’s just more focused,” he said.

The Nunavut Trade Show and Conference opens up to the public Sept. 27 at 10:30 a.m. inside the Arctic Winter Games arena.

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