Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut May 05, 2014 - 3:11 pm

Nunavut court: neighbour says Colin Makpah admitted to stabbing D.J. Gamble

Woman says Makpah came to her door after fight inside house

DAVID MURPHY
Colin Makpah, seen here leaving the Nunavut Court of Justice, is facing one charge of manslaughter in a trial that is scheduled to last three weeks. Makpah is currently on bail. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)
Colin Makpah, seen here leaving the Nunavut Court of Justice, is facing one charge of manslaughter in a trial that is scheduled to last three weeks. Makpah is currently on bail. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)

An agitated and upset Colin Makpah told a neighbour that he stabbed Donald James “D.J.” Gamble and also called an ambulance for him prior to his death, the Nunavut Court of Justice in Iqaluit heard May 5.

That’s what Kelly Kanayok, 30, remembers the night Gamble was stabbed a few doors down from her apartment in Rankin Inlet.

Kanayok testified at Makpah’s trial on the morning of May 5. Makpah, 29, is currently on trial for the stabbing death of Gamble, 23, on Aug. 14, 2010.

Kanayok told Crown prosecutor Faiyaz Amir Alibhai that she woke up around 4 a.m. to the sound of somebody knocking at her door.

She opened it and saw Makpah bleeding from his head, asking for a telephone and some Kleenex.

Kanayok said Makpah seemed scared and looked like he had just finished fighting.

On day one of the trial, Gamble’s friend, Abraham Nakoolak, told the court about a big brawl that occurred at his house the night Gamble died.

As blood dripped from Makpah’s head onto her front porch, Kanayok gave him some toilet paper, as well as the phone number for an ambulance.

“Then he was telling me he stabbed D.J.,” Kanayok said in court.

But Makpah assured her that “he’ll survive” because he was a “300-pound kid.”

Makpah said, “he can’t breathe good,” Kanayok told the court.

Kanayok also pointed to the left side of her stomach, where Makpah told her he stabbed Gamble.

Makpah also asked Kanayok if she planned on taking him to jail, the woman testified. She told him she didn’t know.

On the night in question, after Makpah left, Kanayok said she saw Gamble outside her house talking to paramedics.

“He said he wasn’t going to make it,” Kanayok said.

During cross-examination, Makpah’s defence lawyer, Shayne Kert, ran through what Kanayok said at the trial’s preliminary inquiry, and asked if what she said then remains true.

Whenever she didn’t like an answer Kanayok gave on the stand, Kert referred Kanayok to a transcript of what she said at the preliminary inquiry, and Kanayok would usually change her answer.

Kanayok agreed with Kert that she told Makpah to “just calm down” when she opened the door.

Kanayok also agreed that she never heard Makpah speak on the phone when he called for an ambulance. 

Paraphrasing another statement from the preliminary hearing’s transcript, Makpah told Kanayok that Gamble had got mad “out of nowhere” and starting “coming after him,” Kert said. Again, Kanayok agreed.

The trial is now in week two of its scheduled three weeks.

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