Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut May 02, 2014 - 7:26 am

Nunavut court: Dead man’s spouse says she would have called ambulance

“I would have made sure he was okay”

DAVID MURPHY
Colin Makpah, 29, leaves the Nunavut Court of Justice April 29 after day one of his manslaughter trial, which is expected to take about three weeks. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)
Colin Makpah, 29, leaves the Nunavut Court of Justice April 29 after day one of his manslaughter trial, which is expected to take about three weeks. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)

D.J. Gamble’s common law spouse said she would have called an ambulance “right away” had she known Gamble was fatally stabbed — even ‘though she admitted she saw blood on his shirt the night he died.

Colin Makpah, 29, is on trial at the Nunavut Court of Justice in Iqaluit this week on a charge of manslaughter in connection with Gamble’s Aug. 14, 2010 stabbing death in Rankin Inlet.

Sheryl-Lynn Outchikat, 23, faced questions May 1 from Makpah’s defence lawyer, Shayne Kert, about her spouse’s death.

Kert ran through the sequence of events the night Gamble died, based on statements Outchikat gave previously to the RCMP and at preliminary inquiries prior to the trial.

Outchikat usually answered yes or no in agreement to Kert’s questions.

On Aug. 30 Outchitak said Gamble hit her, and that Gamble’s anger towards Outchikat led to a brawl at Abraham Nakoolak’s house. 

Outchikat agreed with Kert that she had been so desperate to leave the house during the fight that she called a cab company three times to pick up her and her one-year-old daughter.

She agreed with Kert that she had been “scared of what was going to happen.”

Outchikat ran upstairs with her baby while Gamble, Nakoolak and Makpah fought in the kitchen downstairs.

When the commotion stopped, Outchikat said she came downstairs and argued with Gamble, who walked upright.

Outchikat noticed blood on Gamble’s chest, lower area and forehead — although Outchikat told Kert she focused on Gamble’s eyes when speaking to him, not on his shirt.

Outchikat also stated she hit Gamble in the head with an empty 40-ounce vodka bottle during the fight.

Outchikat agreed that on that night, Gamble was more out of control than she had ever seen before, and that she told him, when the fight ended, that their relationship was over.

After their conversation, when Gamble walked out of the house onto the front porch, Outchikat said he didn’t have trouble walking or breathing.

Outchikat then mopped up spots of blood in Nakoolak’s kitchen, where the men fought.

Kert asked Outchikat why she did that.

“Why would I leave them there?” Outchikat answered.

Outchikat also noticed a knife in the living room after the fight, but said it had no blood on it.

Outchikat checked on Gamble a few times later on the house’s front porch, and thought he had just passed out from a long night of drinking.

If she knew Gamble had been stabbed, “I would have made sure he was okay,” Outchikat said, adding that she would have called an ambulance “right away.”

The last time she walked out onto the porch, she saw an RCMP vehicle and a flashlight.

Outchikat said she ran into the house and upstairs when she saw the cops — a “really stupid” move, she told Kert.

Outchikat started sobbing on the witness stand when Kert asked her about how she “desperately” called the health centre after Gamble had been taken away by an ambulance.

The trial, which started Aug. 29, is scheduled to last about three weeks.

 

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