Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Iqaluit June 25, 2014 - 3:02 pm

Nunavut artists pitch in to commemorate Alianait anniversary

Earrings and necklaces will be sold at museum

DAVID MURPHY
Nunavut Arctic College jewelry and metalwork students Lavina Van Heuvelen, left, and Ramona Barkhouse, right, pose with Alianait's executive director Heather Daley June 25 at the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)
Nunavut Arctic College jewelry and metalwork students Lavina Van Heuvelen, left, and Ramona Barkhouse, right, pose with Alianait's executive director Heather Daley June 25 at the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)
Alianait commemorative earrings such as these will be on sale, until supplies last, starting at 7 p.m. June 25 at the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)
Alianait commemorative earrings such as these will be on sale, until supplies last, starting at 7 p.m. June 25 at the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum in Iqaluit. (PHOTO BY DAVID MURPHY)

Visitors to this weekend’s Alianait Arts Festival in Iqaluit will be able to take home their own little piece of this year’s 10th anniversary celebration.

Students from Nunavut Arctic College’s jewelry and metalwork program have made limited edition souvenirs to mark the anniversary.

A team of six students from the program has donated the 32 pieces of jewelry to Alianait, and all proceeds will go towards the festival.

“Having these commemorative pieces can just be a beautiful symbol of 10 years that have built this festival until what it is now,” said Heather Daley, Alianait’s executive director. 

“It just makes it really, really special.”

The necklaces and earrings range in price from $50 to $130 and are only available at the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum.

The first public showing of the pieces starts at 7 p.m. June 25 at the museum and they will be available for sale throughout the festival.

Students wanted to celebrate the theme of this year’s festival within the jewelry designs. This year’s theme — Quviasugitsi, Tamaani Nunattinni — means “Be happy on our land,” in English.

One set of earrings depicts a pair of eyes which are supposed to see over the land. Another set of silver earrings are in the shape of traditional mitts.

“We kind of went with anything we could think of what the land represents to us,” said Ramona Barkhouse, a jewelry program student.

The students also came up with this year’s logo which features two hands, one holding berries and another cloaked in a mitt with the head of a seal on it.

The Alianait Arts Festival kicks off June 27 and lasts until July 1. For more information, go to Alianait’s website here.

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