Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavik September 24, 2012 - 11:57 am

Nunavik develops plan for region-wide recycling, composting

A pilot project will test scenarios to reduce, reuse waste

JANE GEORGE
Kuujjuaq's landfill already sorts out many materials in an attempt to reduce the amount of waste at the dump. Tires are shipped south, thanks to a Recyc-Quebec program, funded by Quebec. (FILE PHOTO)
Kuujjuaq's landfill already sorts out many materials in an attempt to reduce the amount of waste at the dump. Tires are shipped south, thanks to a Recyc-Quebec program, funded by Quebec. (FILE PHOTO)

Nunavik wants to establish recycling programs in the region to increase the lifespans of its landfills and, at the same time, lessen the need for open burning.

That’s spelled out in a new management plan, now in a draft form, with recommendations on ways to reduce waste, which was introduced to councillors at the Kativik Regional Government at the recent meeting of the KRG council in Kuujjuaq.

The plan will also deal with landfill management.

And it will provide guide lines for a “selective collection” process for materials such as plastic, hazardous waste, construction materials, vehicles, metal and tires, which will see these separated out of the materials to be left in the landfills.

The recycling of used clothing may also take place in partnership with the region’s women’s shelters, the program suggests.

The draft management plan, for what it terms “residual materials,” is the first step towards a pilot project in at least one Nunavik community.

That project could involve setting up containers around town to collect plastic, metal, glass and paper, or house by house pick-up.

The plan also calls for composting of vegetable materials or even meat.

The goal is to keep costs at levels that are “economically and social acceptable.”

Regional councillors praised the draft management plan for residual materials, which will be approved later by the KRG executive council.

The next step for the KRG will be to find money from Quebec put it into action.

Nunavimmiut have already received trilingual fridge magnets which show households which materials are considered to be hazardous and should be brought to the hazardous waste collection at municipal landfills or offices.

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