Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavik August 10, 2017 - 9:00 am

New Nunavik greenhouse will convert waste to energy

Quebec touts fresh food, big benefits for Nunavimmiut

SARAH ROGERS
From left, Kativik Regional Government chair Jennifer Munick, Quebec’s Minister of Aboriginal Affairs Geoff Kelley, Kuujjuaq mayor Tunu Napartuk, Makivik Corp. president Jobie Tukkiapik and Quebec Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Pierre Arcand in Kuujjuaq on Aug. 7. (PHOTO COURTESY OG GOV. OF QUEBEC)
From left, Kativik Regional Government chair Jennifer Munick, Quebec’s Minister of Aboriginal Affairs Geoff Kelley, Kuujjuaq mayor Tunu Napartuk, Makivik Corp. president Jobie Tukkiapik and Quebec Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Pierre Arcand in Kuujjuaq on Aug. 7. (PHOTO COURTESY OG GOV. OF QUEBEC)

Quebec ministers travelled to Kuujjuaq earlier this week to launch a $5 million commercial greenhouse pilot project in Nunavik’s largest community.

The $5 million comes from money earmarked for Plan Nord and first announced in Quebec’s spring budget.

Quebec’s minister of energy and natural resources, Pierre Arcand, said the commercial greenhouse planned for Kuujjuaq will also function as a waste-to-energy plant, equipped with a processing system that will serve to heat the structure.

The province’s Société du Plan Nord will lead the project in collaboration with Recyc-Québec and other community partners, Arcand said Aug. 7. 

The installation will transform local waste into thermal energy, while using the energy to heat the hydroponic greenhouse and other existing buildings in the community, he said.

Arcand said the pilot showed “great potential” to benefit Nunavimmiut.

“This unique sustainable development concept hits two targets with one shot: the local community will have excellent-quality fruits and vegetables, while also recovering waste,” Arcand said in an Aug. 7 release. 

“It is without a doubt a novel way of producing fresh food while improving waste management.”

Kuujjuaq already has two greenhouses, operating by the Northern Village of Kuujjuaq and a group of volunteers. 

The Société du Plan Nord has yet to announce which local partners it plans to work with and has yet to offer a timeline for the project.

While in Kuujjuaq, Arcand and Geoff Kelley, the Quebec minister of aboriginal affairs, also announced regional projects that will receive funding through a Plan Nord fund that promotes economic, social and environmental activities.

The Fonds d’initiatives du Plan Nord will distribute $288,721 to eight different efforts, the majority of them Makivik Corp.-led research.

Makivik will receive $87,221 to oversee two studies on renewable energy in Nunavik; the first on potential production of energy from underwater turbines and the second on the use of solar energy.

That’s the organization’s newest expertise; earlier this year, Makivik teamed up with the Fédération des Co-opératives du Nouveau-Québec, or the FCNQ, to launch a new joint venture firm to develop renewable energy

Makivik will also get $55,153 to study the land use by the communities of Salluit and Kangiqsujuaq, and another $50,000 to look at the health of Arctic char in Deception Bay.

Other Fonds d’initiatives du Plan Nord money will go to:

• $34,767 to the Northern village of Salluit to hire a qualified social worker for one-year contract focused on youth suicide prevention;

• $25,000 to the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue and the communities of Ivujivik and Puvirnituq to host a symposium on school success in Puvirnituq;

• $20,830 to the Povungnituk Co-operative Association to lead a feasibility study for a local fish farm; and,

• $15,750 to the Secretariat of the Cree Nation Abitibi-Témiscamingue Economic Alliance to co-ordinate three economic visits to encourage business collaboration between northern regions.

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(4) Comments:

#1. Posted by Luc on August 10, 2017

It is unfortunate that the only one gaining from this project will be the politician,engineer and architect and likely none of them living in the Nunavik.
the cost of the end product will be much higher than what it cost to bring Produce from the south. Un grand elephant blanc.

#2. Posted by Harry on August 10, 2017

I hope it works out and don’t believe the produce would be more expensive.  Hope the money included experts to assist the first year or two.  Hopefully one of the newest NV employees has nothing to do with this, every project/business he has touched fails.

#3. Posted by Luc on August 11, 2017

I also hope that it will work.

#4. Posted by Chesley on August 14, 2017

Having the greenhouse/incinerator project up and running ought to provide for the region/community to become more self-sufficient, that would be excellent, I wish much success to the project, good luck.

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