Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut April 02, 2014 - 8:01 am

Nunavut college’s adult basic education program gains recognition

NABE enhancement scheme builds on students' workplace skills

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Students from Arviat's Adult Basic Education program following a workshop on social media. (PHOTO COURTESY OF NAC)
Students from Arviat's Adult Basic Education program following a workshop on social media. (PHOTO COURTESY OF NAC)

Nunavut Arctic College has been recognized for its Northern Adult Basic Education Enhancement program, which works to develop students’ workplace skills.

After reviewing over 100 programs across Canada, the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Essential Skills Inventory Project has selected the Northern Adult Basic Education Enhancement initiative as one of 10 case studies that best embody its “12 Markers of Promising Practice.”

The project’s 12 markers – identified factors that contribute to the success of Aboriginal programming and resource development — include Indigenous control and ownership of the programming, partnerships, a learner-centered approach, employer involvement, and direct workplace experience.

In the case of NAC’s adult basic education enhancement program, offered in 18 communities across Nunavut, the case study highlighted supported group processes, student-directed learning and a focus on the Inuit way of learning through observation.

“Many of the students who attend our programs are seeking local employment with a plan to further their education at a later time,” said Dan Page, a manager of the adult basic education program at Nunavut Arctic College.

“The ABE Essential Skills program increases an individual’s workplace essential skills by utilizing the kinds of tasks they would encounter in many of the workplaces in Nunavut communities,” Page said. “At the same time, we ensure they have the option to progress along the adult basic education continuum towards further education.”

Nunavut Arctic College’s adult basic education enhancement programs cover reading, writing and numeracy as well as Inuktitut literacy and transitioning from a traditional harvesting economy to a wage-based one.

You can read a case study of the program here.

The First Nations, Inuit and Métis Essential Skills Inventory Project is led by the Canadian Career Development Foundation in partnership with Aboriginal organizations, including Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

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