Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut October 10, 2012 - 6:26 am

More Nunavummiut receive Diamond Jubilee medals

Recipients include a Nunavut actor, musician and an award-winning activist

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Senator Dennis Patterson, Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq, Nunavut Commissioner Edna Elias and Nunavut Premier Eva Aariak presented Diamond Jubilee medals to nine Nunavummiut, recognized for their individual contributions to the well-being of Nunavummiut and Nunavut, at an Oct. 8 ceremony in Iqaluit. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GOVERNMENT OF NUNAVUT)
Senator Dennis Patterson, Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq, Nunavut Commissioner Edna Elias and Nunavut Premier Eva Aariak presented Diamond Jubilee medals to nine Nunavummiut, recognized for their individual contributions to the well-being of Nunavummiut and Nunavut, at an Oct. 8 ceremony in Iqaluit. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GOVERNMENT OF NUNAVUT)

On Oct. 9 in Iqaluit, Nunavut Premier Eva Aariak and Nunavut Commissioner Edna Elias, along with Senator Dennis Patterson and Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq,  awarded Queen Elizabeth II Diamond medals, which commemorate the Queen’s 60 year-reign, to another group of recipients.

The recipients include:

Jimmy Akavak “dedicated 28 years of his life in serving his people and northerners in policing. Born and raised in the North, Jimmy is an example of a person who worked hard to make the north a safer and better place for everyone.”

Ann Hanson served as the third Commissioner of Nunavut from April 21, 2005 until April 20, 2010. “She has been a civil servant, broadcaster, journalist and author and has used her skills in Inuktitut throughout her career. In addition to her work in journalism, Ann also served with the Government of the Northwest Territories. In 1964, she served as a secretary and interpreter/translator in the office of Nunatsiaq Member of Parliament Gene Rheaume. Ann is a recipient of the Order of Canada.”

Anguti Johnson is known “throughout Nunavut and beyond as an actor, celebrated for starring in the recent video, which went viral, filmed right here in Nunavut’s capital: “Feel the Inukness” and for his role in IBC’s popular program for youth, Qanurli?. He is also being recognized for being a role model for youth and for his work with young people.”

Sandy MacDonald is recognized for his service to northerners in the delivery of health care. “Dr. MacDonald moved to the North and has made the North his home. He has worked hard to improving the health of Nunavummiut.”

Josh Qaummariaq was featured on CBC’s “The Current,” where he was recognized as “an emerging aboriginal musician known for his soulful, heartfelt music. His band, The Trade Offs, recently released their debut CD, Red, which was recorded, produced and mastered in Iqaluit and features original songs written by Josh. Josh is being recognized as an inspiration to many young Nunavut musicians.”

Don Sinclair-Chenier is “a leading example of a man whose true measure is not what he does, but what he gives. Don is known for never saying no to requests for charity, whether it be the Iqaluit Food Bank, the Rotary Club, Habitat for Humanity or as the General Manager of an outstanding corporate citizen in Iqaluit, Nunastar Properties Ltd., and as a pillar of the business community and the Baffin Regional Chamber of Commerce. Don is being recognized for his outstanding and selfless contributions to the betterment of our community and Nunavut.”

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is “a Canadian Inuit activist who has provided a strong voice for Inuit on the national and international stage. Sheila was elected President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council in 1995 and re-elected in 1998. In 2002, Sheila was elected as Chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council. In 2005, Sheila helped to launch the world’s first international legal action on climate change and brought worldwide attention to the impacts of climate change on the cultural and environmental human rights of Inuit. Sheila is the recipient of numerous awards and honours, including the Order of Canada.”

David Wilman has lived Iqaluit, where he has been an active member of the community for 42 years. “In those 42 years, David learned Inuktitut, he wrote on how children learn the Inuktitut language, he learned how to hunt and became strong advocate for Inuit rights. David taught for 30 years in Nunavut’s schools and is now the executive director of Tukisigiarvik, an Iqaluit-based organization that offers Inuktitut-language counselling to about 5,000 people a year, and Chair of the Nunavut Liquor Licensing Board.”

Chris Wilson has “devoted considerable time and effort to obtaining and maintaining a high level of Instructor certification, and regularly offers life saving training courses in Iqaluit and to remote communities throughout Nunavut. In addition, Chris is recognized as a community leader who is passionate about the north and the well-being of all northerners.”

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