Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut April 13, 2017 - 11:45 am

JRCC helps medevac man off Nunavut island

"A fairly big operation"

JANE GEORGE
A CH-149 Cormorant lands April 11 on Hatalik Island, between Qikiqtarjuaq and Clyde River, to pick up a man in need of medical treatment. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JRCC)
A CH-149 Cormorant lands April 11 on Hatalik Island, between Qikiqtarjuaq and Clyde River, to pick up a man in need of medical treatment. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JRCC)
Here's a look at the view from the Cormorant which flew to Hatalik Island April 11 on an emergency medevac. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JRCC)
Here's a look at the view from the Cormorant which flew to Hatalik Island April 11 on an emergency medevac. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JRCC)

An April 10 call for an emergency medevac on an island between Qikiqtarjuaq and Clyde River reached a successful end during the morning of April 11.

That’s when a Cormorant helicopter, which had flown in from Nova Scotia, landed at the Iqaluit airport with a man, 62, who had been airlifted off Hatalik Island, for emergency medical treatment.

For the medevac, the Emergency Measures Office of Nunavut called in for assistance the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Halifax, a rescue co-ordination centre operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Canadian Coast Guard.

Search and rescue personnel parachuted to the site from a Hercules jet at about midnight April 10 and stayed with the man until the Cormorant, used for air-sea rescue, arrived April 11.

When the EMO first received word from the health department that there was a man on the land who needed medical assistance, they started looking at what aircraft—such as helicopters and airplanes with skis—were in the vicinity, said Ed Zebedee, director of protection services with the Government of Nunavut,

But as the weather—along with the man’s condition—worsened during the day, the GN’s emergency measures office decided to contact the JRCC. A Hercules was then dispatched with the SAR technicians on board.

“It’s a fairly big operation for this sort of response,” said Zebedee because a Cormorant, which takes 12 hours to reach Iqaluit, needs two flight crews to operate.

The recent medevac marked the first time that the EMO has called the rescue centre this year.

Zebedee said that, “we’re hoping we have a quiet spring, but history says no.”

In a year, EMO co-ordinates about six on-the-land medevacs but these don’t always require extra assistance to carry out, he said,

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(4) Comments:

#1. Posted by Canada's Far North on April 13, 2017

Seriously need a National Search and Rescue Base in Iqaluit or Rankin Inlet.  This would save so much time for emergencies such as this having to be flown in all the way from another part of this vast country!

#2. Posted by Iagree on April 13, 2017

#1 I agree with you, Our Hunters are always in need of medical/Rescue help when they are out on the Land. I am grateful for these people who helped an Elderly Hunter in getting him back for Medical Support.
I wish that this article would be the most read/commented in Nunatsiaq News down the line, Co’mon commenters, say something about our need about our S & R in our North.

#3. Posted by Silas on April 13, 2017

It is becoming apparent that more and more activities are taking place in the Arctic. It will continue to increase as more and more mining companies, cruise ships, individual seamen, possibly shipping, and extreme sportsmen are on the rise up north.
There is a serious need to assess what will be needed in the future and begin to acquire some of the necessary equipment for such operations as S & R and start to look at how Canada will continue maintain its sovereignty in the Arctic.

#4. Posted by Rankin on April 13, 2017

this cold be done each location Iqaluit, Rankin, CamBay, Yellowknife already have facilities known as FOL stations that sit empty and cost a lot of dollars to heat empty every year. Full hangers and accommodations. They could be used to support SARs in each region. 1-2 twin otters fitted with skis for winter tundra wheels for summer and SAR equipment. Sea worthy boats for coastal searches. Use each center as training bases for Cadets, Armed Forces, northern and southern SAR groups across the country and abroad. Use the centers as education stepping for younger people who might want to learn more about SARs , Cold weather rescues, water recuses,....

what a waste of dollars these FOL sites are now sitting empty…put them to better use. just got to get the FEDS to allow their use.

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