Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut June 21, 2012 - 5:30 pm

Iqaluit Public Health to re-open June 26 at QGH

Special TB clinic to be held at building 155 June 25

SAMANTHA DAWSON
The vacant wing on the second floor of the Qikiqtani General Hospital where Iqaluit public health clinics will be held starting June 26. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
The vacant wing on the second floor of the Qikiqtani General Hospital where Iqaluit public health clinics will be held starting June 26. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
Lloyd Searcy, the acting executive director of Iqaluit Health Services, said public health clinics will be offered at Qikiqtani General Hospital in the new section starting June 26 while building 155 undergoes extensive renovations. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
Lloyd Searcy, the acting executive director of Iqaluit Health Services, said public health clinics will be offered at Qikiqtani General Hospital in the new section starting June 26 while building 155 undergoes extensive renovations. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)

Starting June 26, Iqaluit residents who use health care services at the Iqaluit Public Health centre in building 155 will go to an unused wing on the second floor of the Qikiqtani General Hospital for public health and family practice clinics.

Building 155 requires extensive renovations that will take about four months, the acting executive director of Iqaluit Health Services, Lloyd Searcy, said June 21.

Public health services will continue at building 155 until 5:00 p.m. June 22.

However, the public health building will open Monday, June 25, for a TB clinic only.

Iqaluit Public Health and its 29 workers will re-open in the new, temporary location at the hospital June 26.

The next TB clinic after that will be held June 28 at the new location, which is currently vacant.

Although not ideal, the space will work for now, Searcy said.

Meanwhile, renovation at building 155 is expected to take four months.  The GN’s lease for that building, with Coman Arctic, expires in March 2014.

The renovation plan comes after an environmental assessment conducted in May produced a report June 19 showing evidence of mold and asbestos contamination.

The report recommended remediation of the building.

The asbestos was found under the floor tiles and in the furnace, Searcy said.

“It’s really not an issue as long as you don’t disturb it,” he said, adding it will be removed anyway.

The report said flooding and leaks are the likely cause of mold growth on wood and drywall inside the building.

Some molds can trigger asthma attacks, respiratory infections, and large doses of certain molds can cause poisonous, toxic effects in the human body.

Prolonged exposure to asbestos is known to increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma (another, rare form of cancer) as well as non-malignant lung and pleural disorders.

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