Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Iqaluit October 02, 2012 - 11:09 am

Iqaluit coffee shop owner rescues distraught woman

“I did what I did and I want to leave it at that”

SAMANTHA DAWSON
Brian Twerdin, co-owner of the Grind and Brew café, rescued a distraught 19-year-old woman after one of his employees noticed her struggling in the frigid water in front of his business on the morning of Sept. 30. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
Brian Twerdin, co-owner of the Grind and Brew café, rescued a distraught 19-year-old woman after one of his employees noticed her struggling in the frigid water in front of his business on the morning of Sept. 30. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
The breakwater in Iqaluit where a young woman was rescued by restaurant owner Brian Twerdin and later treated for minor hypothermia at the Qikiqtani General Hospital, where she is undergoing a psychiatric assessment. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)
The breakwater in Iqaluit where a young woman was rescued by restaurant owner Brian Twerdin and later treated for minor hypothermia at the Qikiqtani General Hospital, where she is undergoing a psychiatric assessment. (PHOTO BY SAMANTHA DAWSON)

An Iqaluit restaurant owner, Brian Twerdin, rescued a woman from the frigid waters in front of the Grind and Brew restaurant at about 7:40 a.m. Sept. 30, the Iqaluit RCMP said in a news release Oct. 2.

When police arrived,  they found “a distraught woman washed up on the beach in need of medical attention,” police said.

Twerdin told police that he was at work at the Grind and Brew when an employee spotted the woman struggling in the water.

Twerdin jumped into the icy waters and swam out to the woman to help her get safely to shore.

The woman’s rescuer was standing nearby, catching his breath, at the time police arrived.

Twerdin did not receive any injuries as a result of the rescue and recovered fully from the effects of his immersion in near sub-zero temperatures, police said.

First responders took the 19-year-old woman to the Qikiqtani General Hospital, where she received treatment for minor hypothermia and a psychiatric assessment.

Twerdin declined comment on the morning’s events.

“I did what I did and I want to leave it at that,” he said early Oct. 2.

The family and friends of the young woman have thanked Twerdin and the others who helped out Sept. 30, including the Iqaluit RCMP and hospital staff. 

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