Nunatsiaq Online
LETTERS: Around the Arctic August 31, 2017 - 2:30 pm

In Memoriam: Mungo Brodie Ireland (May 29, 1931—Aug. 15, 2017)

"We hope that he will be remembered with the same joy and happiness that he brought to others"

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Mungo Ireland: May 29, 1931—Aug. 15, 2017. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE IRELAND FAMILY)
Mungo Ireland: May 29, 1931—Aug. 15, 2017. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE IRELAND FAMILY)
The late Mungo Ireland loved music. He led the church choir at St. Jude’s Cathedral in Iqaluit for many years and was the resident pianist at the Iqaluit branch of the Royal Canadian Legion for any occasions that warranted a singsong. He was expert at improvisation and could play any tune after having heard it only once, and the piano was always the centre of the home. He also loved to sing and to encourage others to sing, often saying that everyone could sing.  He sang in the Temiskaming Community Choir, the City of Glasgow Chorus, which performed throughout Europe, the Dalhousie Chorale, and Jubilate, a choir whose performances support food banks. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE IRELAND FAMILY)
The late Mungo Ireland loved music. He led the church choir at St. Jude’s Cathedral in Iqaluit for many years and was the resident pianist at the Iqaluit branch of the Royal Canadian Legion for any occasions that warranted a singsong. He was expert at improvisation and could play any tune after having heard it only once, and the piano was always the centre of the home. He also loved to sing and to encourage others to sing, often saying that everyone could sing. He sang in the Temiskaming Community Choir, the City of Glasgow Chorus, which performed throughout Europe, the Dalhousie Chorale, and Jubilate, a choir whose performances support food banks. (PHOTO COURTESY OF THE IRELAND FAMILY)

After a long illness, Mungo Ireland passed away peacefully on Aug. 15 at his home overlooking the cove in East Dover, Nova Scotia.

He was very well-respected in the community and will be sadly missed. Mungo is survived by Jeanette, their five children, 14 grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren, who will all miss him very much. 

Mungo and his wife, Jeanette, emigrated from Scotland to Canada with their young family in 1969 to teach in New Liskeard, in northern Ontario, moving further north to teach, first in Arviat, in 1974.

He was the school principal in Coral Harbour and Baker Lake, as well as at Nakasuk School in Iqaluit.

He served as Justice of the Peace in the Keewatin region, and he also taught Inuit teacher assistants enrolled in the Eastern Arctic Teacher Education Program who were studying towards their Bachelor of Education degree.

Mungo was an advocate for promoting the human rights of all peoples, and worked very hard to make sure that the needs of pupils and students of all cultures were met.

In the 1980s, he was instrumental in designing and developing a management trainee program for Inuit leaders, many of whom went on to work towards forming the territory of Nunavut.

Towards the end of his career, he taught at Inuksuk High School in Iqaluit, and, when he retired, Mungo and Jeanette settled in East Dover, N.S., where they have lived for the past 20 years.

Mungo was a talented musician and taught music throughout his life. He was very active in each and every community where he lived, organizing choirs and music festivals and events, bringing music everywhere he went.

People in Arviat will remember him as Gitaralaak, or “Little Guitar,” as he often taught using his ukulele. He was also an expert dancer, finding any excuse to have a dance, so much so that, in Baker Lake, he was known as The Disco Principal.

In Iqaluit, he directed the church choir at St. Jude’s Cathedral for many years and was the resident pianist at the local branch of the Royal Canadian Legion for any occasions that warranted a singsong. He was expert at improvisation and could play any tune after having heard it only once, and the piano was always the centre of the home.

Mungo also loved to sing and to encourage others to sing, often saying that everyone could sing. He sang in the Temiskaming Community Choir, the City of Glasgow Chorus, who performed throughout Europe, the Dalhousie Chorale, and Jubilate, a choir whose performances support food banks.

Before he went into teaching, Mungo learned his trade as a woodcarver and designer of ecclesiastical furniture and carved the names of soldiers on several community and church war memorials in Scotland.

He was an avid golfer and, just before he became too ill to enjoy the ancient game, he finally got a hole-in-one.

For those who knew Mungo, he will be missed very much, but we hope that he will be remembered with the same joy and happiness that he brought to others.

The Ireland Family
East Dover, N.S.

Email your letters to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Nunatsiaq News welcomes letters to the editor. But we are under no obligation to publish any given letter at any given time.

In our print edition, we usually print letters on a first-come, first-served, space-available basis. In our online edition, we usually print letters as soon as we are able to prepare them for publication.

We edit all letters for length, grammar, punctuation, spelling, taste and libel. You may withhold your name by request, but we must know who you are before we publish your letter.

Email this story to a friend... Print this page... Bookmark and Share

 THIS WEEK’S ADS

 ADVERTISING