Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut April 23, 2014 - 2:38 pm

Faulty fuel truck in Taloyoak a nuisance, but not affecting flights

Week-long repairs could change cargo and baggage loads, Canadian North says

PETER VARGA
A problem with a fuel truck that serves the Taloyoak airport has not affect their flight schedule, a Canadian North spokesperson said. But until the problem is fixed, they may have to make adjustments to cargo or baggage loads so that they can carry extra fuel. (FILE PHOTO)
A problem with a fuel truck that serves the Taloyoak airport has not affect their flight schedule, a Canadian North spokesperson said. But until the problem is fixed, they may have to make adjustments to cargo or baggage loads so that they can carry extra fuel. (FILE PHOTO)

The First Air and Canadian North airlines each say trouble with a fuel dispenser at the Taloyoak airport has not affected their flight schedules to the community.

Airport authorities discovered trouble with the dispenser on the airport’s fuel truck April 11, and the Government of Nunavut issued a “Notice to all Airmen,” or NOTAM, to airlines that day, stating that aircraft could not refuel in the community until about April 25.

“Canadian North continues to provide service to Taloyoak despite impacts on our operations which are costly to our service,” Scott Weatherall, communications manager with the airline, told Nunatsiaq News in an email April 22.

“These impacts may ultimately affect passengers longer term as we may need to offset cargo or baggage in order to carry additional fuel,” he said.

These changes could affect transportion in Taloyoak, Kugaaruk and Gjoa Haven, which are at the eastern end of a circuit the airline runs out of Yellowknife, he said.

Weatherall said bad weather altered flight schedules to the three Nunavut communities on April 21, but said this was not connected to refuelling difficulties.

First Air said April 22 that its flights to the area were not affected.

Paleajook Co-op in Taloyoak provides the aircraft refuelling service at the hamlet’s airport, in a contract with Nunavut’s petroleum products division.

The government sent technicians to assess the refuelling defect on April 22, according to Nunavut’s department of community and government services. The co-op confirmed technicians took samples that day.

“They have to take samples from the truck to make sure the fuel meets specifications,” said Hillary Casey, communications officer for the department.

Results are expected in a week’s time, she said. The department expects the advisory to be lifted by April 25.

Concerns about flight cancellations in Taloyoak are unfounded, Mayor Joe Ashevak told Nunatsiaq News, April 23.

“I haven’t heard of any flights being cancelled myself,” Ashevak said. “Nobody’s complained to the hamlet or given any information (about cancellations) to the hamlet.”

Aside from the “odd charter,” First Air and Canadian North are the only airlines that regularly serve passenger and air cargo service to the community, Ashevak said.

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