Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavut January 09, 2013 - 7:00 am

Aglukkaq announces $1.6 million in infrastructure bucks for Nunavut

Ottawa chips in to help pay for new power plant in Qikiqtarjuaq

BRIELLE MORGAN
Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq, the minister responsible for the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, announcing federal contributions to five Nunavut infrastructure projects Jan. 8. The money includes $500,000 to help build an $8.9 million replacement for Qikiqtarjuaq’s aging power plant. (PHOTO BY BRIELLE MORGAN)
Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq, the minister responsible for the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, announcing federal contributions to five Nunavut infrastructure projects Jan. 8. The money includes $500,000 to help build an $8.9 million replacement for Qikiqtarjuaq’s aging power plant. (PHOTO BY BRIELLE MORGAN)

The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, known as CanNor for short, will help five Nunavut communities by chipping in $1.6 million for infrastructure improvement projects, Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq announced Jan. 8.

Aglukkaq, the minister responsible for CanNor, made the announcement at a press conference in Iqaluit.

The City of Iqaluit will get $500,000 to help pay for a $2 million upgrade to a 20-year-old water booster station. 

“The upgrades will ensure that the city continues to provide adequate drinking water distribution service levels to meet current needs and allow for future expansion,” Iqaluit mayor John Graham said.

The Qulliq Energy Corp. will get $500,000 to help cover the cost of a replacement power plant for Qikiqtarjuaq, which will cost the QEC $9 million.

Another half million will go toward community recreation centre renovations in Kugluktuk and Chesterfield Inlet, while the remaining $110,000 will support the purchase and installation of an eco-ice system for the Baker Lake arena.

Funding for these projects is provided through a program called the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund.

In total, the territories will receive $6.4 million in federal spending over two years through that program.

But Aglukkaq suggested more funding could be allocated to Nunavut.

“This is the first roll-out of the funding… I will be making additional announcements again in Nunavut, as well as NWT and the Yukon,” Aglukkaq said.

Kathleen McLeod, communication manager for CanNor, said CanNor received 43 funding proposals from the territories to date.

The funding criteria is listed on CanNor’s website. All projects are required to begin and end construction prior to March 31, 2014.

As for future funding, the federal government has yet to reveal how it plans to replace its $33 billion long-term infrastructure plan, Building Canada.

The plan was launched in 2007 and expires in 2014.

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