Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavik September 11, 2017 - 4:00 pm

After nearly 40 years, Nunavik school board undergoes a facelift

Switch to Inuktitut name signals "fresh start"

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Alicie Nalukturuk, chair of the Kativik School Board, left, helps unveil the board's new logo and name: Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq or Nunavik School Board, Sept. 11 at Jaanimmarik school in Kuujjuaq. Until the new name is formally approved, however, the school board will continue to use its current name, Kativik Ilisarniliriniq or Kativik School Board. (PHOTO BY CARSON TAGOONA/KATIVIK ILISARNILIRINIQ)
Alicie Nalukturuk, chair of the Kativik School Board, left, helps unveil the board's new logo and name: Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq or Nunavik School Board, Sept. 11 at Jaanimmarik school in Kuujjuaq. Until the new name is formally approved, however, the school board will continue to use its current name, Kativik Ilisarniliriniq or Kativik School Board. (PHOTO BY CARSON TAGOONA/KATIVIK ILISARNILIRINIQ)
The Kativik School Board, now re-launched as the Nunavik School Board or Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq, has a new logo—the first in the school board’s 40-year history. (IMAGE COURTESY OF KSB)
The Kativik School Board, now re-launched as the Nunavik School Board or Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq, has a new logo—the first in the school board’s 40-year history. (IMAGE COURTESY OF KSB)

Nunavik’s regional school board has a new name, and a new look.

The Kativik School Board, named as such since it was first incorporated in 1978, is swapping out Kativik for Nunavik in its new name, launched this week.

The school board’s council of commissioners recently adopted the new name: Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq or Nunavik School Board.

The change is part of the board’s strategic plan and is meant to better reflect the region’s geography and culture, and to signify “a fresh start” for Nunavik’s only school board, its chairperson said in a Sept. 11 release.

“It reflects our vision of education and the strategic directions identified by the school board, where Inuit language, values and identity are at the core of quality education services that enable students to achieve their full potential within a global context,” said chair Alicie Nalukturuk.

The new logo depicts an igloo with the North Star, or Nuusuittuq, overhead, a nod to Inuit tradition astronomical knowledge. It was unveiled at an event in Kuujjuaq Sept. 11.

Along with the new logo, the school board will now use the Inuktitut version of its name, spelled in syllabics and Roman alphabets, Nalukturuk said.

The school board’s “fresh start” comes as its secondary four math, science and technology programs have finally been accredited through Quebec’s education department, after a lag which left secondary students unable to graduate with a provincial diploma for several years.

Now, the board said it’s focused on developing more culturally-relevant programming in the region’s 17 primary and secondary schools, including a land-based environmental science course.

The school board is implementing Smart Tables in all its Grade 1, 2 and 3 classrooms, with the goal of helping students transition from first- to second-language learning and numeral literacy.

The board continues to work towards a new Nunavik history program as well.

Until the new name is formally approved, however, the school board will continue to use its current name, Kativik Ilisarniliriniq or Kativik School Board.

Kativik refers to the administrative region—a regional county municipality, as they’re known in Quebec—that encompasses Nunavik.

The school board was established in the years following the signing of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, which provided for a non-ethnic entity to deliver education to residents of Nunavik.

Chapter 17 of the JBNQA established the KSB, a non-ethnic board which was to offer educational services to all residents of Nunavik, the vast majority being Inuit.

The first council of commissioners meeting was held in September 1976, although the official launch of the school board—distinguishing it from the federal and provincial school programs that had previously operated in the region—took place in July 1978.

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