Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Nunavik September 11, 2017 - 4:00 pm

After nearly 40 years, Nunavik school board undergoes a facelift

Switch to Inuktitut name signals "fresh start"

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
Alicie Nalukturuk, chair of the Kativik School Board, left, helps unveil the board's new logo and name: Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq or Nunavik School Board, Sept. 11 at Jaanimmarik school in Kuujjuaq. Until the new name is formally approved, however, the school board will continue to use its current name, Kativik Ilisarniliriniq or Kativik School Board. (PHOTO BY CARSON TAGOONA/KATIVIK ILISARNILIRINIQ)
Alicie Nalukturuk, chair of the Kativik School Board, left, helps unveil the board's new logo and name: Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq or Nunavik School Board, Sept. 11 at Jaanimmarik school in Kuujjuaq. Until the new name is formally approved, however, the school board will continue to use its current name, Kativik Ilisarniliriniq or Kativik School Board. (PHOTO BY CARSON TAGOONA/KATIVIK ILISARNILIRINIQ)
The Kativik School Board, now re-launched as the Nunavik School Board or Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq, has a new logo—the first in the school board’s 40-year history. (IMAGE COURTESY OF KSB)
The Kativik School Board, now re-launched as the Nunavik School Board or Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq, has a new logo—the first in the school board’s 40-year history. (IMAGE COURTESY OF KSB)

Nunavik’s regional school board has a new name, and a new look.

The Kativik School Board, named as such since it was first incorporated in 1978, is swapping out Kativik for Nunavik in its new name, launched this week.

The school board’s council of commissioners recently adopted the new name: Nunavimmi Ilisarniliriniq or Nunavik School Board.

The change is part of the board’s strategic plan and is meant to better reflect the region’s geography and culture, and to signify “a fresh start” for Nunavik’s only school board, its chairperson said in a Sept. 11 release.

“It reflects our vision of education and the strategic directions identified by the school board, where Inuit language, values and identity are at the core of quality education services that enable students to achieve their full potential within a global context,” said chair Alicie Nalukturuk.

The new logo depicts an igloo with the North Star, or Nuusuittuq, overhead, a nod to Inuit tradition astronomical knowledge. It was unveiled at an event in Kuujjuaq Sept. 11.

Along with the new logo, the school board will now use the Inuktitut version of its name, spelled in syllabics and Roman alphabets, Nalukturuk said.

The school board’s “fresh start” comes as its secondary four math, science and technology programs have finally been accredited through Quebec’s education department, after a lag which left secondary students unable to graduate with a provincial diploma for several years.

Now, the board said it’s focused on developing more culturally-relevant programming in the region’s 17 primary and secondary schools, including a land-based environmental science course.

The school board is implementing Smart Tables in all its Grade 1, 2 and 3 classrooms, with the goal of helping students transition from first- to second-language learning and numeral literacy.

The board continues to work towards a new Nunavik history program as well.

Until the new name is formally approved, however, the school board will continue to use its current name, Kativik Ilisarniliriniq or Kativik School Board.

Kativik refers to the administrative region—a regional county municipality, as they’re known in Quebec—that encompasses Nunavik.

The school board was established in the years following the signing of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, which provided for a non-ethnic entity to deliver education to residents of Nunavik.

Chapter 17 of the JBNQA established the KSB, a non-ethnic board which was to offer educational services to all residents of Nunavik, the vast majority being Inuit.

The first council of commissioners meeting was held in September 1976, although the official launch of the school board—distinguishing it from the federal and provincial school programs that had previously operated in the region—took place in July 1978.

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(14) Comments:

#1. Posted by Superficial on September 11, 2017

It’s always newsworthy, these kind of things. And for the most part many believe all ills will come to an end with the new logo. Imagine the money being spent on that. All the travel to kuujjuaq to see the unveiling of the logo. KSB, please smarten up, and get real.

#2. Posted by long term resident on September 11, 2017

very underwhelmed here… What does it represent??
Wish upon a star that your diploma is real! and it will be.

Come on - this is again a tactic to get away from the real problems that have been created by bad management decisions and that will have to be endured by generations to come.

argh…

#3. Posted by not satisfied... on September 11, 2017

What does the logo represent anyway? doesn’t make sense to me at all. They should have done a drawing contest and let the general public or a committee select the “best” one out of the bunch. For sure this logo wouldn’t have made the cut. Bring back the old logo! I find it is more meaningful and has a saying to it at least. Sheesh!

#4. Posted by Watching on September 11, 2017

They should have changed the administration, laid out a new plan with a new logo. Instead of appreciating this new start it seems like a distraction from the key issues that have not been addressed.

#5. Posted by good start on September 12, 2017

The first 4 comments hiss a familiar sound of not being in control here.

Good for Nunavik.

#6. Posted by Chesley on September 12, 2017

Nice, missing the old one already though. Quebec’s Kativik Regional Government maybe should consider a new banner design as well.

#7. Posted by boox on September 12, 2017

New name and motif are acceptable. Cool, in fact.
Years ago when yamaha changed the sticker design on the bravo, some people scoffed at it and put it down. After some time they realized it was just a decal and the rest of the machine was all there.

#8. Posted by Why change logo on September 12, 2017

KSB Logo is plain ugly. Looks like Greenlandic design, and not Nunavik. Get the old logo back!

#9. Posted by long term resident on September 12, 2017

#7 yes it is quite acceptable indeed, however… as you state “after some time they realized it was just a decal and the rest of the machine was all there”... and in just that one sentence you have underlined the problem.

It is not a change in the logo or the name that will have any significant impact on anything it’s the revamping on the inner workings of the organisation that would.

#10. Posted by 40 years in the making on September 12, 2017

This logo is the only thing accomplished by KSB in the past 40 years. Surely not much accomplished by way of education. Another silly little money spending gimmick, to confirmed the inadequate workings of a school board that failed us. Trying to make up with painting the surface.

#11. Posted by Curious on September 12, 2017

I wonder who design this new logo? Im curious what does it mean? Does it mean Star of Bethlehem. First time i see the new logo thats what i though

#12. Posted by Nunavik region on September 12, 2017

KSB used to try to move to Nunavik but it seems it does not want to.  Board members like to their board meeting in November in Montreal.  So it is good for them to have a big office in Montreal.

After a while you begin to see what is really important to the the board.  90% graduation of students who beging Sec level should be their goal.  It should even board goal 1, 2, and 3 until it becomes normal. 

Change the board not what you call the dog.

#13. Posted by Ilu on September 12, 2017

The logo was not made in Nunavik but some Inuit might have been involved but I have no idea to what capacity.

I think the development of the logo started a few years ago, I started hearing about it a while back. But like Air Inuit’s, not made in Nuanvik.

The text in syllabic looks good.

Wasn’t KSB’s name Kativik Ilinnianiliriniq in Inuttitut? They could have chosen a name that can be understood in any dialect of the region.

But it looks better than the last logo and we will most likely become accustom to it. The shade of blue is nice.

I don’t want to be stuck with could have been thoughts, so here is our school board’s logo. Doesn’t seem to represent education for students or a cold and lonely place?

Such mistakes happen when organizations do not invest well in design or when consultations aren’t properly conducted. We are stuck with such results, the best we can do is do our part to better what we can.

#14. Posted by Ilu on September 12, 2017

Doesn’t seem to represent education for students but it seems to represent a cold and lonely place.

Sorry for my typos, I was tired when I wrote it.

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