Nunatsiaq Online
NEWS: Climate Change March 24, 2011 - 4:34 am

In 60 years, the Arctic got two degrees warmer

Statistics Canada crunches temperature readings for 1948 to 2009

NUNATSIAQ NEWS
This graph shows the gradual two-degree rise in average temperatures in the Arctic Mountains and Fiords climatic region— which runs from Iqaluit up the coast of Baffin Island. (IMAGE/STATSCAN)
This graph shows the gradual two-degree rise in average temperatures in the Arctic Mountains and Fiords climatic region— which runs from Iqaluit up the coast of Baffin Island. (IMAGE/STATSCAN)

During the past 60 years, from 1948 to 2009, the trend in average annual temperatures for Canada as a whole has increased by 1.4 C.

And, according to a March 23 Statistics Canada report, the strongest warming trends were located in climatic regions that include the Arctic, which they’ve the Arctic Tundra; Arctic Mountains and Fiords; Mackenzie District; and Yukon and North British Columbia Mountains, shown in the map below.

“Temperature trends in Canada,” an EnviroStats report, examined data for 11 climatic regions, including include nearly all of Nunavut and Nunavik, and for all of Canada between 1948 and 2009.

The Mackenzie District climate region recorded the strongest warming trend, rising 2.2 C over normal.

The Arctic Mountains and Fiords climatic region, which includes Iqaluit and the coast of Baffin Island, wasn’t far behind, with an increase of about 2 C during the same 60-year period.

Average winter and spring temperatures got milder over the past 60 years, the report says. Average summer and fall temperatures also increased over normal, but at slower rates.

Statistics Canada says the strongest warming trends in Canada over the past 60 years were located in the Arctic, specifically the Arctic Tundra; Arctic Mountains and Fiords; Mackenzie District; and Yukon and North British Columbia Mountains.
Statistics Canada says the strongest warming trends in Canada over the past 60 years were located in the Arctic, specifically the Arctic Tundra; Arctic Mountains and Fiords; Mackenzie District; and Yukon and North British Columbia Mountains.
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